Evaluate HAA removal in biologically active carbon filters using the ICR database

Hsin hsin Tung, Yuefeng F. Xie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration on haloacetic acid (HAA) levels in plant effluents and distribution systems were investigated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The results showed that average HAA5 concentrations in all locations were 20. 4 μg·L -1 and 29. 6 μg·L -1 in ICR plants with granular activated carbon (GAC) and ICR plants without GAC process, respectively. For plants without GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and July to September. However, for plants with GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and January to March. This HAA level profile inversely correlated well with water temperature, or biologic activity. For GAC plants, simulated distribution samples matched well with distribution system equivalent samples for Cl 3AA and THMs. For plants with and without GAC, simulated distribution samples overestimated readily biodegradable HAAs in distribution systems. The study indicated that through HAA biodegradation, GAC process plays an important role in lowering HAA levels in finished drinking water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)489-496
Number of pages8
JournalFrontiers of Environmental Science and Engineering in China
Volume5
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

Fingerprint

activated carbon
filter
acid
carbon
distribution system
removal
biodegradation
water temperature
drinking water
effluent

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

@article{e4d598959440447d9117097b32039ec2,
title = "Evaluate HAA removal in biologically active carbon filters using the ICR database",
abstract = "The effects of biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration on haloacetic acid (HAA) levels in plant effluents and distribution systems were investigated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The results showed that average HAA5 concentrations in all locations were 20. 4 μg·L -1 and 29. 6 μg·L -1 in ICR plants with granular activated carbon (GAC) and ICR plants without GAC process, respectively. For plants without GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and July to September. However, for plants with GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and January to March. This HAA level profile inversely correlated well with water temperature, or biologic activity. For GAC plants, simulated distribution samples matched well with distribution system equivalent samples for Cl 3AA and THMs. For plants with and without GAC, simulated distribution samples overestimated readily biodegradable HAAs in distribution systems. The study indicated that through HAA biodegradation, GAC process plays an important role in lowering HAA levels in finished drinking water.",
author = "Tung, {Hsin hsin} and Xie, {Yuefeng F.}",
year = "2011",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11783-011-0312-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "489--496",
journal = "Frontiers of Environmental Science and Engineering",
issn = "2095-2201",
publisher = "Springer Science + Business Media",
number = "4",

}

Evaluate HAA removal in biologically active carbon filters using the ICR database. / Tung, Hsin hsin; Xie, Yuefeng F.

In: Frontiers of Environmental Science and Engineering in China, Vol. 5, No. 4, 01.12.2011, p. 489-496.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluate HAA removal in biologically active carbon filters using the ICR database

AU - Tung, Hsin hsin

AU - Xie, Yuefeng F.

PY - 2011/12/1

Y1 - 2011/12/1

N2 - The effects of biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration on haloacetic acid (HAA) levels in plant effluents and distribution systems were investigated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The results showed that average HAA5 concentrations in all locations were 20. 4 μg·L -1 and 29. 6 μg·L -1 in ICR plants with granular activated carbon (GAC) and ICR plants without GAC process, respectively. For plants without GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and July to September. However, for plants with GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and January to March. This HAA level profile inversely correlated well with water temperature, or biologic activity. For GAC plants, simulated distribution samples matched well with distribution system equivalent samples for Cl 3AA and THMs. For plants with and without GAC, simulated distribution samples overestimated readily biodegradable HAAs in distribution systems. The study indicated that through HAA biodegradation, GAC process plays an important role in lowering HAA levels in finished drinking water.

AB - The effects of biologically active carbon (BAC) filtration on haloacetic acid (HAA) levels in plant effluents and distribution systems were investigated using the United States Environmental Protection Agency's Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The results showed that average HAA5 concentrations in all locations were 20. 4 μg·L -1 and 29. 6 μg·L -1 in ICR plants with granular activated carbon (GAC) and ICR plants without GAC process, respectively. For plants without GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and July to September. However, for plants with GAC, the highest HAA levels were observed in the quarters of April to June and January to March. This HAA level profile inversely correlated well with water temperature, or biologic activity. For GAC plants, simulated distribution samples matched well with distribution system equivalent samples for Cl 3AA and THMs. For plants with and without GAC, simulated distribution samples overestimated readily biodegradable HAAs in distribution systems. The study indicated that through HAA biodegradation, GAC process plays an important role in lowering HAA levels in finished drinking water.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=82655182057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=82655182057&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11783-011-0312-8

DO - 10.1007/s11783-011-0312-8

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:82655182057

VL - 5

SP - 489

EP - 496

JO - Frontiers of Environmental Science and Engineering

JF - Frontiers of Environmental Science and Engineering

SN - 2095-2201

IS - 4

ER -