Evaluating both physiological and biomechanical strains in women using different hoe handle designs

Kiseok Sung, Andris Freivalds

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Physiological and biomechanical strains were investigated in women using four different handle designs for hoe. Electromyography (EMG), energy expenditure, and task workload were measured while using four different hoes: a conventional hoe with 1) the normal (N) handle, 2) the second (S) handle, 3) the T-grip with arm supporter (TA) handle, and 4) the second with T-grip and arm supporter (STA) handle. Each handle strained different regions of the body. The S handle was significantly better for minimizing the erector spinae muscle EMG. The TA handle required less effort on the flexor digitorum profundus (FDP), but more effort on the posterior deltoid. From the STA handle, no interaction was found between the S and TA handle. The results from energy expenditure analysis indicated that the workload in hoeing involves mainly a pushing and pulling motion of the shoulder (r = .923). In comparison with the N handle, the additional handles caused a significantly greater workload, but there was no significant difference between those three handles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1795-1799
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9780945289456
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Event58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 - Chicago, United States
Duration: Oct 27 2014Oct 31 2014

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2014-January
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other58th International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014
CountryUnited States
CityChicago
Period10/27/1410/31/14

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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  • Cite this

    Sung, K., & Freivalds, A. (2014). Evaluating both physiological and biomechanical strains in women using different hoe handle designs. In 2014 International Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2014 (pp. 1795-1799). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; Vol. 2014-January). Human Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1177/1541931214581374