Evaluating the benefits of hospital room artwork for patients receiving cancer treatment: A randomized controlled trial

Daniel George, Claire de Boer, Joel Hammer, Margaret Hopkins, Tonya King, Michael Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We examined whether placing a painting in the line of vision of a hospitalized patient improves patient outcomes and satisfaction and whether having patients choose their paintings offers greater benefit. From 2014 to 2016, we enrolled 186 inpatients with cancer diagnoses from Pennsylvania State University Cancer Institute and randomly assigned them to three groups: those who chose paintings displayed in rooms, those whose paintings were randomly selected, and those with no paintings. We assessed anxiety, mood, depression, quality of life, perceptions of hospital environment, sense of control and/or influence, self-reported pain, and length of stay and compared patients with paintings versus those without paintings, as well as those with an artwork choice versus those with no choice. There were no differences in psychological and/ or clinical outcomes across the groups, but patients in the three groups with paintings reported significantly improved perceptions of the hospital environment. Integrating artwork into inpatient rooms may represent one means of improving perceptions of the institution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-561
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Hospital Medicine
Volume13
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2018

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Patients' Rooms
Paintings
Randomized Controlled Trials
Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Inpatients
Patient Satisfaction
Length of Stay
Anxiety
Quality of Life
Depression
Psychology
Pain

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Leadership and Management
  • Fundamentals and skills
  • Health Policy
  • Care Planning
  • Assessment and Diagnosis

Cite this

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Evaluating the benefits of hospital room artwork for patients receiving cancer treatment : A randomized controlled trial. / George, Daniel; de Boer, Claire; Hammer, Joel; Hopkins, Margaret; King, Tonya; Green, Michael.

In: Journal of Hospital Medicine, Vol. 13, No. 8, 01.08.2018, p. 558-561.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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