Evaluating the empirical support for the role of testosterone in the geschwind-behan-galaburda model of cerebral lateralization - commentary on Bryden, Mcmanus, and Bulman-Fleming

Sheri A. Berenbaum, Susan D. Denburg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The main tenet of the GBG model relates to the prenatal action of testosterone. Anomalies in cerebral dominance, immune functioning, abilities, and neural crest development are hypothesized to correlate with each other because all result from high levels of prenatal testosterone. Studies directly evaluating the effect of testosterone on these traits do not validate the model: sex ratios and animal studies suggest that testosterone has a protective, rather than facilitory, effect on autoimmune diseases; individuals with high levels of early testosterone do not have elevated rates of left-handedness or learning disabilities. These findings reinforce Bryden et al, s conclusions that there is little empirical support for the GBG model, and that it is wise to consider other theories in evaluating data derived from the model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-83
Number of pages5
JournalBrain and cognition
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

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Testosterone
Cerebral Dominance
Functional Laterality
Aptitude
Neural Crest
Learning Disorders
Sex Ratio
Autoimmune Diseases
Cerebral Lateralization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

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