Evaluating the feasibility and efficacy of a self-administered manual-based stress management intervention for individuals with asthma: Results from a controlled study

Jill Hockemeyer, Joshua Morrison Smyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several behavioral medicine interventions (eg, relaxation training and written emotional expression) have been proposed as effective supplemental treatments for individuals with chronic illnesses such as asthma. Whether these treatments are feasible or effective in a manual-based, self-administered format is unclear, and few studies have examined the effectiveness of such treatments presented in a complementary format. We examined the feasibility and effectiveness of a 4-week stress management treatment compared with a matched placebo intervention in young adults with asthma. Both groups considered the workbooks credible treatment interventions and completed them conscientiously. The treatment group showed significant improvement in measures of lung function compared with the placebo group, but analysis revealed no differences in measures of perceived stress. These findings provide initial support for the feasibility of self-administered manual-based interventions and some evidence that they can produce health benefits in individuals with asthma and, perhaps, other chronic conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)161-172
Number of pages12
JournalBehavioral Medicine
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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