Evaluation of a Pediatric Resident Skills-Based Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Substance Use

Sheryl Ryan, Michael V. Pantalon, Deepa Camenga, Shara Martel, Gail D'Onofrio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate a screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment curriculum for alcohol and other substance use developed, implemented and integrated into a pediatric residency program. Methods: During a 1-month adolescent medicine rotation, pediatric, and medicine/pediatric residents in an urban teaching hospital completed a 2 1/2-hour formal curriculum including a didactic lecture, a 40-minute video describing the Brief Negotiation Interview (BNI), and a skill-based session practicing the BNI and receiving individualized feedback. Access to a website with didactic material was provided. Outcome measures were pre- and post-training knowledge, BNI performance measured with a standardized patient using a validated BNI adherence scale, satisfaction with training, and adoption of BNI into clinical practice. Results: Of the 106 residents trained, 92(87%) completed both pre- and post-test evaluations. Significant improvements were found in pre- versus post-test scores of knowledge, (20.0 [2.4 SD] vs. 24.1 [3.5 SD], p <.001) and BNI performance comparing pre- and post BNI adherence scale total scores, (5.14 [1.8 S.D.] vs. 11.5 [.96], p<.001). Residents reported high satisfaction with training, [1.4, SD .5, immediately and 1.6, SD .6, 30-days post training)with scores ranging from 1 to 5 with lower score=greater satisfaction. During the 12-month follow-up period, we received 83 responses from residents reporting a total of 129 BNIs in actual clinical settings. Conclusions: A screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment curriculum was successfully integrated into an adolescent medicine elective in a pediatric residency program. Residents demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge and skills performing the BNI, with high satisfaction and adoption of the BNI into clinical practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Negotiating
Curriculum
Referral and Consultation
Interviews
Pediatrics
Adolescent Medicine
Therapeutics
Internship and Residency
Urban Hospitals
Teaching Hospitals
Alcohols
Medicine
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

@article{da445244f1014b3a9fe824d81816b378,
title = "Evaluation of a Pediatric Resident Skills-Based Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Substance Use",
abstract = "Purpose: To evaluate a screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment curriculum for alcohol and other substance use developed, implemented and integrated into a pediatric residency program. Methods: During a 1-month adolescent medicine rotation, pediatric, and medicine/pediatric residents in an urban teaching hospital completed a 2 1/2-hour formal curriculum including a didactic lecture, a 40-minute video describing the Brief Negotiation Interview (BNI), and a skill-based session practicing the BNI and receiving individualized feedback. Access to a website with didactic material was provided. Outcome measures were pre- and post-training knowledge, BNI performance measured with a standardized patient using a validated BNI adherence scale, satisfaction with training, and adoption of BNI into clinical practice. Results: Of the 106 residents trained, 92(87{\%}) completed both pre- and post-test evaluations. Significant improvements were found in pre- versus post-test scores of knowledge, (20.0 [2.4 SD] vs. 24.1 [3.5 SD], p <.001) and BNI performance comparing pre- and post BNI adherence scale total scores, (5.14 [1.8 S.D.] vs. 11.5 [.96], p<.001). Residents reported high satisfaction with training, [1.4, SD .5, immediately and 1.6, SD .6, 30-days post training)with scores ranging from 1 to 5 with lower score=greater satisfaction. During the 12-month follow-up period, we received 83 responses from residents reporting a total of 129 BNIs in actual clinical settings. Conclusions: A screening, brief intervention and referral to treatment curriculum was successfully integrated into an adolescent medicine elective in a pediatric residency program. Residents demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge and skills performing the BNI, with high satisfaction and adoption of the BNI into clinical practice.",
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Evaluation of a Pediatric Resident Skills-Based Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) Curriculum for Substance Use. / Ryan, Sheryl; Pantalon, Michael V.; Camenga, Deepa; Martel, Shara; D'Onofrio, Gail.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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