Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Currently, trichloroethene (TCE) is the most prevalent groundwater contaminant in the United States. In situ bioremediation is an emerging technology for the treatment of chloroethenes, like TCE. Although TCE can be degraded through a variety of microbial processes, field studies indicate that naturally occurring degradation is most frequently incomplete, stalling at the toxic intermediates cis-1,2-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride. Besides a lack of an appropriate microbial population, the exact reason for incomplete dechlorination is unknown; however, it is accepted that a suitable electron donor source is critical for supporting microbial growth, creating strongly reducing conditions, and sewing as a supply of electrons for reductive dehalogenation. In this study, the fermentable substrate, chitin, was evaluated for its ability to support a diverse community of microorganisms capable of complete TCE remediation. To elucidate the complex interactions between chitin fermentation products and reductive dechlorination processes, a set of sacrificial, continuous flow columns were established. The columns were packed with a mixture of chitin and sand, inoculated with an appropriate mixed ̀ulture, and then supplied with a continuous flow of natural, TCE-amended groundwater. Effluent from the columns was collected every 4 - 5 days and monitored for chlorinated ethenes, pH, volatile fatty acids, chloride, and microbial DNA. Pore water and sediment from along the length of the columns was similarly collected every 1 - 2 pore volumes (20 - 40 days). This presentation will highlight the dynamic chemical gradients that were observed over the course of remediation, and forecast the distribution of the associated microbial community, which will be analyzed in future work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationBattelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007
Pages725
Number of pages1
Volume1
StatePublished - 2007
Event9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007 - Baltimore, MD, United States
Duration: May 7 2007May 10 2007

Other

Other9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore, MD
Period5/7/075/10/07

Fingerprint

Trichloroethylene
trichloroethylene
Remediation
remediation
Chitin
chitin
substrate
Substrates
Dechlorination
dechlorination
Groundwater
chloride
Dehalogenation
Vinyl Chloride
Volatile fatty acids
electron
groundwater
Electrons
Bioremediation
Volatile Fatty Acids

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

McElhoe, J. A., & Brennan, R. A. (2007). Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate. In Battelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007 (Vol. 1, pp. 725)
McElhoe, Jennifer A. ; Brennan, Rachel Alice. / Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate. Battelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007. Vol. 1 2007. pp. 725
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McElhoe, JA & Brennan, RA 2007, Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate. in Battelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007. vol. 1, pp. 725, 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007, Baltimore, MD, United States, 5/7/07.

Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate. / McElhoe, Jennifer A.; Brennan, Rachel Alice.

Battelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007. Vol. 1 2007. p. 725.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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McElhoe JA, Brennan RA. Evaluation of dynamic chemical gradients during the course of trichloroethene remediation using a fermentable substrate. In Battelle Press - 9th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium 2007. Vol. 1. 2007. p. 725