Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting

Douglas K. Brownell, Jude Liu, James W. Hilton, Thomas Lehman Richard, Glen R. Cauffman, Brian R. Macafee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Machine field efficiency and operating costs are important aspects of biomass harvesting. Two harvesting systems were selected and examined through harvesting alfalfa, wheat straw, and switchgrass. One harvesting system consists of a typical forage harvester and several forage trucks depending on the distance between a field and the dump site; the other system was a self-loading/chopping forage wagon. Both of these systems pick up windrows prepared by a mower and windrow merger or rake. The effects of varying moisture content (10 to 75%) and distance from field to dump site were studied. The systems to be compared were operated in adjoining fields of known acreage. The cycle time, weight of material harvested, and fuel used by each system were recorded. The self-loading wagon system used significantly less fuel and required less man hours to harvest a similar amount of material. The tons of alfalfa per gallon of fuel used to harvest a field 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the silo were .74 Mg per liter (3.08 tons per gallon) and .33 Mg per liter (1.37 tons per gallon) for the wagon and forage harvesting system respectively. Man hours required to harvest the same field were 42.56 Mg per man hour (46.91 tons per man hour) and 10.31 Mg per man hour (11.37 tons per man hour) for the wagon and forage harvesting system respectively.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009
Pages6490-6502
Number of pages13
Volume10
StatePublished - 2009
EventAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009 - Reno, NV, United States
Duration: Jun 21 2009Jun 24 2009

Other

OtherAmerican Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009
CountryUnited States
CityReno, NV
Period6/21/096/24/09

Fingerprint

wagons
Biomass
forage
biomass
Medicago sativa
alfalfa
forage harvesters
mowers
rakes
Panicum
chopping
operating costs
Panicum virgatum
trucks
Motor Vehicles
wheat straw
Triticum
water content
Weights and Measures
Costs and Cost Analysis

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Brownell, D. K., Liu, J., Hilton, J. W., Richard, T. L., Cauffman, G. R., & Macafee, B. R. (2009). Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009 (Vol. 10, pp. 6490-6502)
Brownell, Douglas K. ; Liu, Jude ; Hilton, James W. ; Richard, Thomas Lehman ; Cauffman, Glen R. ; Macafee, Brian R. / Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting. American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. Vol. 10 2009. pp. 6490-6502
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abstract = "Machine field efficiency and operating costs are important aspects of biomass harvesting. Two harvesting systems were selected and examined through harvesting alfalfa, wheat straw, and switchgrass. One harvesting system consists of a typical forage harvester and several forage trucks depending on the distance between a field and the dump site; the other system was a self-loading/chopping forage wagon. Both of these systems pick up windrows prepared by a mower and windrow merger or rake. The effects of varying moisture content (10 to 75{\%}) and distance from field to dump site were studied. The systems to be compared were operated in adjoining fields of known acreage. The cycle time, weight of material harvested, and fuel used by each system were recorded. The self-loading wagon system used significantly less fuel and required less man hours to harvest a similar amount of material. The tons of alfalfa per gallon of fuel used to harvest a field 8.5 km (5.3 miles) from the silo were .74 Mg per liter (3.08 tons per gallon) and .33 Mg per liter (1.37 tons per gallon) for the wagon and forage harvesting system respectively. Man hours required to harvest the same field were 42.56 Mg per man hour (46.91 tons per man hour) and 10.31 Mg per man hour (11.37 tons per man hour) for the wagon and forage harvesting system respectively.",
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Brownell, DK, Liu, J, Hilton, JW, Richard, TL, Cauffman, GR & Macafee, BR 2009, Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting. in American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. vol. 10, pp. 6490-6502, American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, Reno, NV, United States, 6/21/09.

Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting. / Brownell, Douglas K.; Liu, Jude; Hilton, James W.; Richard, Thomas Lehman; Cauffman, Glen R.; Macafee, Brian R.

American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. Vol. 10 2009. p. 6490-6502.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Brownell DK, Liu J, Hilton JW, Richard TL, Cauffman GR, Macafee BR. Evaluation of two forage harvesting systems for herbaceous biomass harvesting. In American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers Annual International Meeting 2009, ASABE 2009. Vol. 10. 2009. p. 6490-6502