Evidence for a relationship between daily caffeine consumption and accuracy of time estimation

Michele Mc Clellan Stine, Richard J. O'Connor, Bonnie R. Yatko, Neil E. Grunberg, Laura Cousino Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

The present study examined the relationship between regular caffeine consumption and time estimation. Sixty participants (aged 18-57 years, mean 24 years) completed a 47 s time estimation exercise and questionnaires related to daily caffeine consumption and perceptions of time. We hypothesized that the effects of caffeine on time estimation would follow a U-shaped pattern such that individuals who reported moderate amounts of daily caffeine would be more accurate in their perceptions of time than would those who reported high amounts of caffeine intake or no daily caffeine consumption. Timing accuracy was computed by dividing participant-reported time by actual time (47 s). Timing accuracy followed a U-shaped curve such that those respondents who reported 'low' daily caffeine consumption (≤ 135 mg/day, n = 24) were the most accurate in their time estimates (mean = 44.2 s). Individuals who reported no caffeine (mean = 69.3 s; n = 7) or 'high' daily caffeine consumption (mean = 56.2 s; >135 mg/day, n = 28) were less accurate in their time estimates [F(2,56) = 3.34, p < 0.05]. Findings suggest that 'low' daily caffeine consumption may enhance time estimation accuracy above that of 'high' or no daily caffeine consumption.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-367
Number of pages7
JournalHuman Psychopharmacology
Volume17
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2002

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Pharmacology (medical)

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