Evolution of lower respiratory symptoms in New York police officers after 9/11: A prospective longitudinal study

Larisa V. Buyantseva, Mark Tulchinsky, George M. Kapalka, Vernon Chinchilli, Zhengmin Qian, Robert Gillio, Arthur Roberts, Rebecca Bascom

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We studied the evolution of lower respiratory symptoms at 1 month (initial) and 19 months (follow-up) after the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 (9/11). METHODS: A total of 1588 New York police officers completed initial self-administered questionnaires. The level of 9/11 exposure and pre-9/11 health was available in 1373. Of those, 471 (426 with no pre-9/11 chronic respiratory disease) completed a follow-up telephone survey. RESULTS: Prevalence of cough was 43.5% at both initial and follow-up assessments, but increased were the prevalence of phlegm (14.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001), shortness of breath (18.9% to 43.6%, P < 0.001), and wheeze (13.1% to 25.9%, P < 0.001). Rates of delayed-onset (present on follow-up assessment only) cough, phlegm, shortness of breath, and wheeze were 21%, 21.9%, 31.7%, and 17.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the lower respiratory symptoms increased between 1 month and 19 months after 9/11.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-317
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume49
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2007

Fingerprint

Police
Cough
Dyspnea
Longitudinal Studies
Prospective Studies
Telephone
Chronic Disease
Health
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{59345411fc544c0db6be70536a90f5f5,
title = "Evolution of lower respiratory symptoms in New York police officers after 9/11: A prospective longitudinal study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We studied the evolution of lower respiratory symptoms at 1 month (initial) and 19 months (follow-up) after the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 (9/11). METHODS: A total of 1588 New York police officers completed initial self-administered questionnaires. The level of 9/11 exposure and pre-9/11 health was available in 1373. Of those, 471 (426 with no pre-9/11 chronic respiratory disease) completed a follow-up telephone survey. RESULTS: Prevalence of cough was 43.5{\%} at both initial and follow-up assessments, but increased were the prevalence of phlegm (14.4{\%} to 30.7{\%}, P < 0.001), shortness of breath (18.9{\%} to 43.6{\%}, P < 0.001), and wheeze (13.1{\%} to 25.9{\%}, P < 0.001). Rates of delayed-onset (present on follow-up assessment only) cough, phlegm, shortness of breath, and wheeze were 21{\%}, 21.9{\%}, 31.7{\%}, and 17.3{\%}, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the lower respiratory symptoms increased between 1 month and 19 months after 9/11.",
author = "Buyantseva, {Larisa V.} and Mark Tulchinsky and Kapalka, {George M.} and Vernon Chinchilli and Zhengmin Qian and Robert Gillio and Arthur Roberts and Rebecca Bascom",
year = "2007",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/JOM.0b013e318032256e",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "49",
pages = "310--317",
journal = "Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine",
issn = "1076-2752",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "3",

}

Evolution of lower respiratory symptoms in New York police officers after 9/11 : A prospective longitudinal study. / Buyantseva, Larisa V.; Tulchinsky, Mark; Kapalka, George M.; Chinchilli, Vernon; Qian, Zhengmin; Gillio, Robert; Roberts, Arthur; Bascom, Rebecca.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 3, 01.03.2007, p. 310-317.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evolution of lower respiratory symptoms in New York police officers after 9/11

T2 - A prospective longitudinal study

AU - Buyantseva, Larisa V.

AU - Tulchinsky, Mark

AU - Kapalka, George M.

AU - Chinchilli, Vernon

AU - Qian, Zhengmin

AU - Gillio, Robert

AU - Roberts, Arthur

AU - Bascom, Rebecca

PY - 2007/3/1

Y1 - 2007/3/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: We studied the evolution of lower respiratory symptoms at 1 month (initial) and 19 months (follow-up) after the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 (9/11). METHODS: A total of 1588 New York police officers completed initial self-administered questionnaires. The level of 9/11 exposure and pre-9/11 health was available in 1373. Of those, 471 (426 with no pre-9/11 chronic respiratory disease) completed a follow-up telephone survey. RESULTS: Prevalence of cough was 43.5% at both initial and follow-up assessments, but increased were the prevalence of phlegm (14.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001), shortness of breath (18.9% to 43.6%, P < 0.001), and wheeze (13.1% to 25.9%, P < 0.001). Rates of delayed-onset (present on follow-up assessment only) cough, phlegm, shortness of breath, and wheeze were 21%, 21.9%, 31.7%, and 17.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the lower respiratory symptoms increased between 1 month and 19 months after 9/11.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We studied the evolution of lower respiratory symptoms at 1 month (initial) and 19 months (follow-up) after the collapse of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001 (9/11). METHODS: A total of 1588 New York police officers completed initial self-administered questionnaires. The level of 9/11 exposure and pre-9/11 health was available in 1373. Of those, 471 (426 with no pre-9/11 chronic respiratory disease) completed a follow-up telephone survey. RESULTS: Prevalence of cough was 43.5% at both initial and follow-up assessments, but increased were the prevalence of phlegm (14.4% to 30.7%, P < 0.001), shortness of breath (18.9% to 43.6%, P < 0.001), and wheeze (13.1% to 25.9%, P < 0.001). Rates of delayed-onset (present on follow-up assessment only) cough, phlegm, shortness of breath, and wheeze were 21%, 21.9%, 31.7%, and 17.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the lower respiratory symptoms increased between 1 month and 19 months after 9/11.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33947174587&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33947174587&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318032256e

DO - 10.1097/JOM.0b013e318032256e

M3 - Article

C2 - 17351517

AN - SCOPUS:33947174587

VL - 49

SP - 310

EP - 317

JO - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

JF - Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine

SN - 1076-2752

IS - 3

ER -