Evolutionary and ecological links between plant and fungal viruses

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(Table presented.). Summary: Plants and microorganisms have been interacting in both positive and negative ways for millions of years. They are also frequently infected with viruses that can have positive or negative impacts. A majority of virus families with members that infect fungi have counterparts that infect plants, and in some cases the phylogenetic analyses of these virus families indicate transmission between the plant and fungal kingdoms. These similarities reflect the host relationships; fungi are evolutionarily more closely related to animals than to plants but share very few viral signatures with animal viruses. The details of several of these interactions are described, and the evolutionary implications of viral cross-kingdom interactions and horizontal gene transfer are proposed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)86-92
Number of pages7
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume221
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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mycoviruses
Plant Viruses
plant viruses
Viruses
viruses
Fungi
Horizontal Gene Transfer
fungi
microorganisms
Fungal Viruses
phylogeny
animals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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Evolutionary and ecological links between plant and fungal viruses. / Roossinck, Marilyn J.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 221, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 86-92.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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