Exaggerated post exercise hypotension following concentric but not eccentric resistance exercise: Implications for metabolism

Jon Stavres, Stephen M. Fischer, John McDaniel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Post exercise hypotension (PEH) is primarily attributed to post-exercise vasodilation via central and peripheral mechanisms. However, the specific contribution of metabolic cost during exercise, independent of force production, is less clear. This study aimed to use isolated concentric and eccentric exercise to examine the role of metabolic activity in eliciting PEH, independent of total work. Twelve participants (6 male) completed upper and lower body concentric (CONC), eccentric (ECC), and traditional (TRAD) exercise sessions matched for work (3 × 10 in TRAD and 3 × 20 in CONC and ECC; all at 65% 1RM). Blood pressure was collected at baseline and every 15 min after exercise for 120 min. Brachial blood flow and vascular conductance were also assessed at baseline, immediately after exercise, and every 30 min after exercise. ⩒O2 was lower during ECC compared to CONC and TRAD (−2.7 mL/Kg/min ± 0.4 and −2.2 mL/Kg/min ± 0.4, respectively p < 0.001). CONC augmented the PEH response (Peak ΔMAP −3.3 mmHg ± 0.9 [mean ± SE], p = 0.006) through 75 min of recovery and ECC elicited a post-exercise hypertensive response through 120 min of recovery (Peak ΔMAP +4.5 mmHg ± 0.8, p < 0.001). CONC and TRAD elicited greater increases in brachial blood flow post exercise than ECC (Peak Δ brachial flow +190.4 mL/min ± 32.3, +202.3 mL/min ± 39.2, and 69.6 mL/min ± 19.8, respectively, p ≤ 0.005), while conductance increased immediately post exercise in all conditions and then decreased throughout recovery following ECC (−32.9 mL/min/mmHg ± 9.3, p = 0.005). These data suggest that more metabolically demanding concentric exercise augments PEH compared to work-matched eccentric exercise.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)983-993
Number of pages11
JournalEuropean Journal of Sport Science
Volume19
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 9 2019

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

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