Examining clinical judgment in an adaptive intervention design: The Fast Track Program

Karen L. Bierman, Robert L. Nix, Jerry J. Maples, Susan A. Murphy, John D. Coie, Kenneth A. Dodge, E. Michael Foster, Mark Greenberg, John E. Lochman, Robert J. McMahon, Ellen E. Pinderhughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

33 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although clinical judgment is often used in assessment and treatment planning, rarely has research examined its reliability, validity, or impact in practice settings. This study tailored the frequency of home visits in a prevention program for aggressive- disruptive children (n = 410; 56% minority) on the basis of 2 kinds of clinical judgment: ratings of parental functioning using a standardized multi-item scale and global assessments of family need for services. Stronger reliability and better concurrent and predictive validity emerged for the 1st kind of clinical judgment than for the 2nd. Exploratory analyses suggested that using ratings of parental functioning to tailor treatment recommendations improved the impact of the intervention by the end of 3rd grade but using more global assessments of family need did not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)468-481
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of consulting and clinical psychology
Volume74
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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