Examining discursive formations in early childhood media research: A genealogical analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The study of popular culture and children has a long and intimate relationship in many fields within the humanities and social sciences, yet in the applied field of Early Childhood Education and Care, the relationship is rather fraught. Employing a Foucauldian genealogical approach, I trace the ways in which intellectual traditions and discourses (i.e. history, politics, and sacrosanct values of European aesthetics and childhood innocence) have shaped contemporary understandings and debates in the field. With attention to Foucault’s concepts of power/knowledge couplet, and discursive archives, my focus in on how these axiomatic “myths” have assembled as “regimes of truth.” I thus argue for the need for the field of Early Childhood Education and Care to engage in and consider more contextualized, nuanced, and empirically oriented studies of young children and their engagement with consumer culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)225-237
Number of pages13
JournalGlobal Studies of Childhood
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

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early childhood education and care
communication research
childhood
social science and humanities
history politics
education
Education
Social Sciences
Politics
popular culture
esthetics
Esthetics
Research
myth
aesthetics
politics
social science
History
discourse
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Development
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Examining discursive formations in early childhood media research : A genealogical analysis. / Henward, Allison Sterling.

In: Global Studies of Childhood, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.09.2018, p. 225-237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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