Examining Feasibility of Mentoring Families at a Farmers' Market and Community Garden

Daniel George, Monica Manglani, Kaitlin Minnehan, Alexander Chacon, Alexandra Gundersen, Cheryl Dellasega, Jennifer Kraschnewski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Fruit and vegetable prescription (FVRx) programs provide “prescriptions” for produce, but increased access to nutritional food may be insufficient for long-term behavior change. Purpose: We integrated nutritional education into an FVRx program at a farmers' market and community garden at Penn State Medical Center by pairing medical student “mentors” with 4 families with overweight/obese children. Methods: Each head of household completed a presurvey that included basic demographic information, as well as a question about barriers to healthy eating. Families made up to 4 visits to the market with mentors, during which students discussed and documented produce utilization. A 1-hour focus group with mentors was conducted and transcribed. Thematic analysis was performed on qualitative data. Results: Two families completed all visits. On average, families spent 32 minutes at the market/garden per visit, had expenditures of $40.68, and reported one weekly produce item going unused. Families valued on-site mentoring, and students felt that it provided opportunities for professional development and improved self-care while also benefiting vendors. Discussion: Integrating medical student nutritional mentoring into an FVRx program was feasible and conferred benefits to participating families, students, and vendors. Translation to Health Education Practice: Educators should consider pairing access to nutritional foods with mentoring.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-98
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Education
Volume47
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 3 2016

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mentoring
farmer
Mentors
market
community
Students
Medical Students
Prescriptions
medical student
medication
food
Food
student
Self Care
Health Expenditures
vegetables
Focus Groups
eating behavior
Health Education
Vegetables

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

George, Daniel ; Manglani, Monica ; Minnehan, Kaitlin ; Chacon, Alexander ; Gundersen, Alexandra ; Dellasega, Cheryl ; Kraschnewski, Jennifer. / Examining Feasibility of Mentoring Families at a Farmers' Market and Community Garden. In: American Journal of Health Education. 2016 ; Vol. 47, No. 2. pp. 94-98.
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Examining Feasibility of Mentoring Families at a Farmers' Market and Community Garden. / George, Daniel; Manglani, Monica; Minnehan, Kaitlin; Chacon, Alexander; Gundersen, Alexandra; Dellasega, Cheryl; Kraschnewski, Jennifer.

In: American Journal of Health Education, Vol. 47, No. 2, 03.03.2016, p. 94-98.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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