Examining the role of scientific identity in black student retention in a STEM scholar program

Leticia Oseguera, Hyun Ju Park, Maria Javiera De Los Rios, Elyzza M. Aparicio, Royel Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study reports on early program retention in a multi-component undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) scholar program aimed at diversifying STEM at a large, research-intensive, predominantly White university. The authors drew on London and associates’ STEM Engagement Framework to determine what factors are related to remaining in the program through the first two years. Results indicate that having a high scientific identity and reporting fewer instances of discrimination increased the likelihood of remaining in the program. Black students were somewhat more likely than the other underrepresented racially minoritized (URM) groups to remain in the program and were as likely as non-URM participants to remain enrolled in the program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)229-248
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Negro Education
Volume88
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Anthropology

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