Examining the use of adaptive technologies to increase the hands-on participation of students with blindness or low vision in secondary-school chemistry and physics

Cary A. Supalo, Jennifer R. Humphrey, Thomas E. Mallouk, H. David Wohlers, William S. Carlsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether a suite of audible adaptive technologies would increase the hands-on participation of high school students with blindness or low vision in chemistry and physics courses, data were examined from a multi-year field study conducted with students in mainstream classrooms at secondary schools across the United States. The students worked with sighted laboratory partners. Four categories of data were analyzed with regard to levels of hands-on participation, including quantitative coding of video-recorded laboratory lessons, qualitative assessment of the same videos, student interviews, and teacher interviews. Evidence in support of the efficacy of the technologies to increase the students' hands-on participation during laboratory lessons was substantial. However, certain factors affected the quantitative interpretation of the data: students with usable low vision experienced similar levels of participation both with and without the adaptations, and students with little usable vision often required more time than did students with full vision to accomplish some laboratory tasks. Additional factors inherent to natural educational environments were also determined to have strong effects on student outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1174-1189
Number of pages16
JournalChemistry Education Research and Practice
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016

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blindness
physics
secondary school
chemistry
Physics
Students
participation
student
video
interview
coding
classroom
interpretation
teacher

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Supalo, Cary A. ; Humphrey, Jennifer R. ; Mallouk, Thomas E. ; David Wohlers, H. ; Carlsen, William S. / Examining the use of adaptive technologies to increase the hands-on participation of students with blindness or low vision in secondary-school chemistry and physics. In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice. 2016 ; Vol. 17, No. 4. pp. 1174-1189.
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Examining the use of adaptive technologies to increase the hands-on participation of students with blindness or low vision in secondary-school chemistry and physics. / Supalo, Cary A.; Humphrey, Jennifer R.; Mallouk, Thomas E.; David Wohlers, H.; Carlsen, William S.

In: Chemistry Education Research and Practice, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.01.2016, p. 1174-1189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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