Executive functioning deficits increase kindergarten children's risk for reading and mathematics difficulties in first grade

Paul Morgan, Hui Li, George Farkas, Michael Cook, Wik Hung Pun, Marianne Messersmith Hillemeier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Whether executive functioning deficits result in children experiencing learning difficulties is presently unclear. Yet evidence for these hypothesized causal relations has many implications for early intervention design and delivery. We used a multi-year panel design, multiple criterion and predictor variable measures, extensive statistical control for potential confounds including autoregressive prior histories of both reading and mathematics difficulties, and additional epidemiological methods to preliminarily examine these hypothesized relations. Results from multivariate logistic regression analyses of a nationally representative and longitudinal sample of 18,080 children (i.e., the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study – Kindergarten Cohort of 2011, or ECLS-K: 2011) indicated that working memory and, separately, cognitive flexibility deficits uniquely increased kindergarten children's risk of experiencing reading as well as mathematics difficulties in first grade. The risks associated with working memory deficits were particularly strong. Experimentally-evaluated, multi-component interventions designed to help young children with reading or mathematics difficulties may also need to remediate early deficits in executive function, particularly in working memory.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-32
Number of pages10
JournalContemporary Educational Psychology
Volume50
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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kindergarten child
Mathematics
Reading
deficit
school grade
Short-Term Memory
mathematics
Epidemiologic Methods
learning disorder
Executive Function
Memory Disorders
kindergarten
Longitudinal Studies
longitudinal study
flexibility
Logistic Models
logistics
childhood
Regression Analysis
Learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Executive functioning deficits increase kindergarten children's risk for reading and mathematics difficulties in first grade. / Morgan, Paul; Li, Hui; Farkas, George; Cook, Michael; Pun, Wik Hung; Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith.

In: Contemporary Educational Psychology, Vol. 50, 01.07.2017, p. 23-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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