Exogenous gangliosides - How do they cross the blood-brain barrier and how do they inhibit cell proliferation?

Cara Lynne Schengrund, Christine M. Mummert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gangliosides have been used to treat specific central nervous system lesions and to inhibit proliferation of neuroblastoma cells in vitro. However, the mechanisms by which they (1) cross the blood-brain barrier and (2) inhibit cell proliferation have not been clearly defined. Evidence is presented in support of the hypotheses that (1) serum albumin functions in the transport of gangliosidcs across the blood-brain barrier, and (2) when gangliosides inhibit cell proliferation, they do so by inhibiting the activity of DNA polymerases α and β.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)278-283
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume845
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

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