Exotic earths: Forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration

Sean N. Raymond, Avi M. Mandell, Steinn Sigurdsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

129 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Close-in giant planets (e.g., "hot Jupiters") are thought to form far from their host stars and migrate inward, through the terrestrial planet zone, via torques with a massive gaseous disk. Here we simulate terrestrial planet growth during and after giant planet migration. Several-Earth-mass planets also form interior to the migrating jovian planet, analogous to recently discovered "hot Earths." Very-water-rich, Earth-mass planets form from surviving material outside the giant planet's orbit, often in the habitable zone and with low orbital eccentricities. More than a third of the known systems of giant planets may harbor Earth-like planets.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1413-1416
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume313
Issue number5792
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 8 2006

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Planets
Earth (Planet)
Torque
Orbit
Water
Growth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

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Raymond, Sean N. ; Mandell, Avi M. ; Sigurdsson, Steinn. / Exotic earths : Forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration. In: Science. 2006 ; Vol. 313, No. 5792. pp. 1413-1416.
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Exotic earths : Forming habitable worlds with giant planet migration. / Raymond, Sean N.; Mandell, Avi M.; Sigurdsson, Steinn.

In: Science, Vol. 313, No. 5792, 08.09.2006, p. 1413-1416.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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