Experimental fluid mechanics of pulsatile artificial blood pumps

Steven Deutsch, John M. Tarbell, Keefe B. Manning, Gerson Rosenberg, Arnold A. Fontaine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fluid mechanics of artificial blood pumps has been studied since the early 1970s in an attempt to understand and mitigate hemolysis and thrombus formation by the device. Pulsatile pumps are characterized by inlet jets that set up a rotational "washing" pattern during filling. Strong regurgitant jets through the closed artificial heart valves have Reynolds stresses on the order of 10,000 dynes/cm2 and are the most likely cause of red blood cell damage and platelet activation. Although the flow in the pump chamber appears benign, low wall shear stresses throughout the pump cycle can lead to thrombus formation at the wall of the smaller pumps (10-50 cc). The local fluid mechanics is critical. There is a need to rapidly measure or calculate the wall shear stress throughout the device so that the results may be easily incorporated into the design process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-86
Number of pages22
JournalAnnual Review of Fluid Mechanics
Volume38
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 21 2006

Fingerprint

blood pumps
fluid mechanics
pumps
shear stress
artificial heart valves
hemolysis
Reynolds stress
washing
erythrocytes
platelets
chambers
activation
damage
cycles
causes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

@article{191864bb80f94a80a59bdd840167263a,
title = "Experimental fluid mechanics of pulsatile artificial blood pumps",
abstract = "The fluid mechanics of artificial blood pumps has been studied since the early 1970s in an attempt to understand and mitigate hemolysis and thrombus formation by the device. Pulsatile pumps are characterized by inlet jets that set up a rotational {"}washing{"} pattern during filling. Strong regurgitant jets through the closed artificial heart valves have Reynolds stresses on the order of 10,000 dynes/cm2 and are the most likely cause of red blood cell damage and platelet activation. Although the flow in the pump chamber appears benign, low wall shear stresses throughout the pump cycle can lead to thrombus formation at the wall of the smaller pumps (10-50 cc). The local fluid mechanics is critical. There is a need to rapidly measure or calculate the wall shear stress throughout the device so that the results may be easily incorporated into the design process.",
author = "Steven Deutsch and Tarbell, {John M.} and Manning, {Keefe B.} and Gerson Rosenberg and Fontaine, {Arnold A.}",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1146/annurev.fluid.38.050304.092022",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "65--86",
journal = "Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics",
issn = "0066-4189",
publisher = "Annual Reviews Inc.",

}

Experimental fluid mechanics of pulsatile artificial blood pumps. / Deutsch, Steven; Tarbell, John M.; Manning, Keefe B.; Rosenberg, Gerson; Fontaine, Arnold A.

In: Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 38, 21.02.2006, p. 65-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Experimental fluid mechanics of pulsatile artificial blood pumps

AU - Deutsch, Steven

AU - Tarbell, John M.

AU - Manning, Keefe B.

AU - Rosenberg, Gerson

AU - Fontaine, Arnold A.

PY - 2006/2/21

Y1 - 2006/2/21

N2 - The fluid mechanics of artificial blood pumps has been studied since the early 1970s in an attempt to understand and mitigate hemolysis and thrombus formation by the device. Pulsatile pumps are characterized by inlet jets that set up a rotational "washing" pattern during filling. Strong regurgitant jets through the closed artificial heart valves have Reynolds stresses on the order of 10,000 dynes/cm2 and are the most likely cause of red blood cell damage and platelet activation. Although the flow in the pump chamber appears benign, low wall shear stresses throughout the pump cycle can lead to thrombus formation at the wall of the smaller pumps (10-50 cc). The local fluid mechanics is critical. There is a need to rapidly measure or calculate the wall shear stress throughout the device so that the results may be easily incorporated into the design process.

AB - The fluid mechanics of artificial blood pumps has been studied since the early 1970s in an attempt to understand and mitigate hemolysis and thrombus formation by the device. Pulsatile pumps are characterized by inlet jets that set up a rotational "washing" pattern during filling. Strong regurgitant jets through the closed artificial heart valves have Reynolds stresses on the order of 10,000 dynes/cm2 and are the most likely cause of red blood cell damage and platelet activation. Although the flow in the pump chamber appears benign, low wall shear stresses throughout the pump cycle can lead to thrombus formation at the wall of the smaller pumps (10-50 cc). The local fluid mechanics is critical. There is a need to rapidly measure or calculate the wall shear stress throughout the device so that the results may be easily incorporated into the design process.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=32644453420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=32644453420&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1146/annurev.fluid.38.050304.092022

DO - 10.1146/annurev.fluid.38.050304.092022

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:32644453420

VL - 38

SP - 65

EP - 86

JO - Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics

JF - Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics

SN - 0066-4189

ER -