Experimental investigation of micro-scale contact fatigue wear damage on EBM-built Ti6Al4V surface

S. Shrestha, J. Ryu, G. P. Manogharan

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

Abstract

Superior tribo-corrosion resistivity of titanium alloys has drawn attention from biomedical industries. Design freedom of additive manufacturing (AM) technology has been a major advantage for custom biomedical implants. Therefore, additively manufactured Ti6Al4V joint implants would be a desirable solution for optimum orthopedic replacements. In this study, surface fatigue behavior of AM made Ti6Al4V is investigated to understand the correlations between process-induced anisotropic properties and fatigue wear resistance. Repeated single asperity sliding contact experiment is employed to simulate contact fatigue motions. Wear damage rate and roughness evolution are monitored as a function of mechanical stimuli and additive layer orientations. Results are compared with traditional (mill-annealed) Ti6Al4V surface. This newer understanding of fatigue wear mechanism on AM made implants will promote the extensive biomedical application of AM technology by identifying optimal build orientations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1144-1149
Number of pages6
StatePublished - 2020
Event2016 Industrial and Systems Engineering Research Conference, ISERC 2016 - Anaheim, United States
Duration: May 21 2016May 24 2016

Conference

Conference2016 Industrial and Systems Engineering Research Conference, ISERC 2016
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim
Period5/21/165/24/16

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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