Experimentation and modeling of surface chemistry of the silica-water interface for low salinity waterflooding at elevated temperatures

Timothy S. Duffy, Balaji Raman, Derek Hall, Michael L. Machesky, Russell Taylor Johns, Serguei Lvov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Models predicting wettability alteration of mineral-brine-oil interfaces during low-salinity-waterflooding (LSW) should account for the elevated temperatures typically found in oil reservoirs. For the first time, high temperature ζ-potential (zeta potential) data for silica are collected and used to interpret surface chemistries and interactions at reservoir-like conditions to predict temperature's effect on wettability alteration. Mobility data for amorphous silica in varying NaCl(aq) concentrations at 25, 100, and 150 °C and neutral pH were obtained through microelectrophoresis experiments. Calculated ζ-potentials were fit with surface complexation model (SCM) parameters to predict electrical double layer (EDL) parameters based upon the Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Grahame (GCSG) model. ζ-potentials increased with increasing temperature (around 50% increase from 25 to 150 °C) and decreasing NaCl concentrations (10 −1 –10 −4 mol kg −1 ). These trends, along with Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, suggests that overall repulsive forces extend farther from the surface at low salinity and higher temperatures, implying greater wetting thickness/surface wettability in these environments. The resulting surface concentration calculations suggest that LSW is most impactful up to 10 −2 mol kg −1 of salt, and that additional dilution below 10 −3 mol kg −1 will negligibly impact oil recovery, particularly at reservoir temperatures above 100 °C. The analysis provides a framework for treating more complex reservoir systems, such as carbonates in multivalent brines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-243
Number of pages11
JournalColloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects
Volume570
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 5 2019

Fingerprint

Well flooding
experimentation
salinity
Surface chemistry
Silicon Dioxide
Silica
Wetting
chemistry
silicon dioxide
wettability
Water
water
Oils
Temperature
temperature
oil recovery
mineral oils
brines
Brines
Mineral oils

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry

Cite this

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title = "Experimentation and modeling of surface chemistry of the silica-water interface for low salinity waterflooding at elevated temperatures",
abstract = "Models predicting wettability alteration of mineral-brine-oil interfaces during low-salinity-waterflooding (LSW) should account for the elevated temperatures typically found in oil reservoirs. For the first time, high temperature ζ-potential (zeta potential) data for silica are collected and used to interpret surface chemistries and interactions at reservoir-like conditions to predict temperature's effect on wettability alteration. Mobility data for amorphous silica in varying NaCl(aq) concentrations at 25, 100, and 150 °C and neutral pH were obtained through microelectrophoresis experiments. Calculated ζ-potentials were fit with surface complexation model (SCM) parameters to predict electrical double layer (EDL) parameters based upon the Gouy-Chapman-Stern-Grahame (GCSG) model. ζ-potentials increased with increasing temperature (around 50{\%} increase from 25 to 150 °C) and decreasing NaCl concentrations (10 −1 –10 −4 mol kg −1 ). These trends, along with Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek (DLVO) theory, suggests that overall repulsive forces extend farther from the surface at low salinity and higher temperatures, implying greater wetting thickness/surface wettability in these environments. The resulting surface concentration calculations suggest that LSW is most impactful up to 10 −2 mol kg −1 of salt, and that additional dilution below 10 −3 mol kg −1 will negligibly impact oil recovery, particularly at reservoir temperatures above 100 °C. The analysis provides a framework for treating more complex reservoir systems, such as carbonates in multivalent brines.",
author = "Duffy, {Timothy S.} and Balaji Raman and Derek Hall and Machesky, {Michael L.} and Johns, {Russell Taylor} and Serguei Lvov",
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language = "English (US)",
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T1 - Experimentation and modeling of surface chemistry of the silica-water interface for low salinity waterflooding at elevated temperatures

AU - Duffy, Timothy S.

AU - Raman, Balaji

AU - Hall, Derek

AU - Machesky, Michael L.

AU - Johns, Russell Taylor

AU - Lvov, Serguei

PY - 2019/6/5

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