Expert Teams in the Academic Library: Going Beyond Subject Expertise to Create Scaffolded Instruction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article explores the way librarians define, leverage, and amplify expertise in a twenty-first century academic library. An expert team comprised of a nursing librarian, online learning librarian, information-literacy librarian, and assessment librarian sorted the learning outcomes from the Information-Literacy Competency Standards for Nursing created by the Health Sciences Interest Group taskforce of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) by grade-levels. Results found distinguishing experts within a library supports the customization of scaffolded instruction. Additionally, using expert teams in academic libraries supports the larger mission of universities to integrate libraries into teaching and research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)313-333
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Library Administration
Volume58
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2018

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librarian
expertise
expert
instruction
nursing
literacy
health science
interest group
twenty-first century
learning
university
Teaching

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Administration
  • Library and Information Sciences

Cite this

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