Explicit instruction with or without high-p sequences: Which is more effective to teach multiplication facts?

David L. Lee, Sam Stansbery, Richard Kubina, Rachel Wannarka

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Basic fact acquisition is an important component for developing higher-order math skills. However, getting students with a history of academic noncompliance to engage in activities related to skills acquisition can be difficult. Prior research demonstrates that engagement increases when nonpreferred activities are preceded by a series of brief activities with a high probability of completion. This technique, called high-p task/request sequences, was not fully explored within the context of skill acquisition. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of adding high-p sequences to explicit instruction on the math fact acquisition of three elementary-age students in a learning support classroom. Results showed no differences in fact acquisition between explicit instruction and explicit instruction with an added high-p component. However, the high-p sessions took nearly twice as long to complete when compared to explicit instruction alone. Implications for instructional efficiency and limitations of the high-p procedures for acquisition tasks are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-281
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Behavioral Education
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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