Exploring extreme events on social media: A comparison of user reposting/retweeting behaviors on Twitter and Weibo

Xialing Lin, Kenneth A. Lachlan, Patric R. Spence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although recent research suggests that Twitter and other forms of micro-blogging are becoming increasingly relied upon by both the public and response agencies dealing with crises and disasters, little is known about how these dynamics may play out in a non-Western context. The current study examines the use of the Chinese Weibo service during a 2013 smog emergency, and compares user generated content to that found in earlier data concerning a weather event in North America. The results indicate that by way of comparison, the Weibo sample contained proportionately similar degrees of informative and affective content, but that users were less likely to use humor and showed no increase in affective outpouring as the crisis developed. Results are discussed in terms of implications for those designing social media campaigns for informing and motivating those affected by large-scale weather-related crises.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-581
Number of pages6
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume65
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2016

Fingerprint

Social Media
Weather
Disasters
Smog
Blogging
Wit and Humor
North America
Emergencies
Research
Affective

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

@article{e5a2762cf3d2451698dbb3c3b808ab26,
title = "Exploring extreme events on social media: A comparison of user reposting/retweeting behaviors on Twitter and Weibo",
abstract = "Although recent research suggests that Twitter and other forms of micro-blogging are becoming increasingly relied upon by both the public and response agencies dealing with crises and disasters, little is known about how these dynamics may play out in a non-Western context. The current study examines the use of the Chinese Weibo service during a 2013 smog emergency, and compares user generated content to that found in earlier data concerning a weather event in North America. The results indicate that by way of comparison, the Weibo sample contained proportionately similar degrees of informative and affective content, but that users were less likely to use humor and showed no increase in affective outpouring as the crisis developed. Results are discussed in terms of implications for those designing social media campaigns for informing and motivating those affected by large-scale weather-related crises.",
author = "Xialing Lin and Lachlan, {Kenneth A.} and Spence, {Patric R.}",
year = "2016",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.chb.2016.04.032",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "576--581",
journal = "Computers in Human Behavior",
issn = "0747-5632",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

Exploring extreme events on social media : A comparison of user reposting/retweeting behaviors on Twitter and Weibo. / Lin, Xialing; Lachlan, Kenneth A.; Spence, Patric R.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 65, 01.12.2016, p. 576-581.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring extreme events on social media

T2 - A comparison of user reposting/retweeting behaviors on Twitter and Weibo

AU - Lin, Xialing

AU - Lachlan, Kenneth A.

AU - Spence, Patric R.

PY - 2016/12/1

Y1 - 2016/12/1

N2 - Although recent research suggests that Twitter and other forms of micro-blogging are becoming increasingly relied upon by both the public and response agencies dealing with crises and disasters, little is known about how these dynamics may play out in a non-Western context. The current study examines the use of the Chinese Weibo service during a 2013 smog emergency, and compares user generated content to that found in earlier data concerning a weather event in North America. The results indicate that by way of comparison, the Weibo sample contained proportionately similar degrees of informative and affective content, but that users were less likely to use humor and showed no increase in affective outpouring as the crisis developed. Results are discussed in terms of implications for those designing social media campaigns for informing and motivating those affected by large-scale weather-related crises.

AB - Although recent research suggests that Twitter and other forms of micro-blogging are becoming increasingly relied upon by both the public and response agencies dealing with crises and disasters, little is known about how these dynamics may play out in a non-Western context. The current study examines the use of the Chinese Weibo service during a 2013 smog emergency, and compares user generated content to that found in earlier data concerning a weather event in North America. The results indicate that by way of comparison, the Weibo sample contained proportionately similar degrees of informative and affective content, but that users were less likely to use humor and showed no increase in affective outpouring as the crisis developed. Results are discussed in terms of implications for those designing social media campaigns for informing and motivating those affected by large-scale weather-related crises.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84975463409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84975463409&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chb.2016.04.032

DO - 10.1016/j.chb.2016.04.032

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84975463409

VL - 65

SP - 576

EP - 581

JO - Computers in Human Behavior

JF - Computers in Human Behavior

SN - 0747-5632

ER -