Exploring the impact of a pedometer on body composition and physical fitness in a Cohort of U.S. military medical students: A pilot study

Robert Lystrup, Gordon F. West, Matthew Ward, Jennifer Hall, Mark Stephens

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Military medical professionals play a central role in preventing and treating obesity among America's warriors through training, medical care, and their personal example. Unfortunately, medical students in both undergraduate and graduate settings often experience declines in physical fitness. Pedometry has been demonstrated as one means of promoting fitness with 10,000 steps/day generally accepted as a key benchmark. With this in mind, we used pedometry as an incentive during the preclinical years to encourage students to adopt a more active lifestyle. Findings suggest that participants that consistently report meeting the 10,000 steps/day maintained or improved their aerobic fitness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-25
Number of pages3
JournalMilitary medicine
Volume180
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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Benchmarking
Physical Fitness
Body Composition
Medical Students
Life Style
Motivation
Obesity
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

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Exploring the impact of a pedometer on body composition and physical fitness in a Cohort of U.S. military medical students : A pilot study. / Lystrup, Robert; West, Gordon F.; Ward, Matthew; Hall, Jennifer; Stephens, Mark.

In: Military medicine, Vol. 180, No. 1, 01.01.2015, p. 23-25.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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