Exploring the learning curve in medical education: using self-assessment as a measure of learning.

Britta M. Thompson, John C. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Learning is a complex process that follows predictable patterns. The authors explored whether students' self-assessment of competencies could be used as a measure of learning within medical school. METHOD: Medical students (all grade levels) rated their achievement of competencies at the beginning and end of an academic year. Repeated-measures ANOVA and [eta]2 were used to determine differences. RESULTS: Five hundred thirty-three students participated (response rate = 79.3%). Self-assessment ratings between four grade levels were significant (P < .001, [eta]2 = 0.33), with the steepest difference between MS2 and MS3; professionalism ratings remained relatively stable. The largest percent increase within an academic year occurred between MS1 and MS2, with little increase within MS3 and MS4. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students' self-assessment ratings of competencies indicated differences between grade levels and during an academic year, following a sigmoidal curve. These results have implications for medical education and indicate the need to develop longitudinal measures to track changes in learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAcademic Medicine
Volume83
Issue number10 Suppl
StatePublished - Oct 2008

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Learning Curve
self-assessment
Medical Education
school grade
rating
Learning
Medical Students
medical student
Students
learning
education
Medical Schools
Analysis of Variance
student
school
Self-Assessment

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Learning is a complex process that follows predictable patterns. The authors explored whether students' self-assessment of competencies could be used as a measure of learning within medical school. METHOD: Medical students (all grade levels) rated their achievement of competencies at the beginning and end of an academic year. Repeated-measures ANOVA and [eta]2 were used to determine differences. RESULTS: Five hundred thirty-three students participated (response rate = 79.3{\%}). Self-assessment ratings between four grade levels were significant (P < .001, [eta]2 = 0.33), with the steepest difference between MS2 and MS3; professionalism ratings remained relatively stable. The largest percent increase within an academic year occurred between MS1 and MS2, with little increase within MS3 and MS4. CONCLUSIONS: Medical students' self-assessment ratings of competencies indicated differences between grade levels and during an academic year, following a sigmoidal curve. These results have implications for medical education and indicate the need to develop longitudinal measures to track changes in learning.",
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Exploring the learning curve in medical education : using self-assessment as a measure of learning. / Thompson, Britta M.; Rogers, John C.

In: Academic Medicine, Vol. 83, No. 10 Suppl, 10.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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