Exploring Untested Measures on Public Opinion on the Use of Racial Profiling During Traffic Stops to Identify Criminals

George E. Higgins, Shaun L. Gabbidon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

In recent years scholars have researched various aspects of public opinion on racial profiling. To date the literature has confirmed that racial and ethnic minorities tend to perceive the practice of racial profiling differently than do Whites. Specifically, Blacks and Hispanics tend to perceive profiling as being widespread and not justified. A host of other correlates, such as age, gender, education level, class, and neighborhood factors, also significantly predict public opinion on profiling. This article diverges from past research by attempting to determine whether perceptions regarding the discriminatory nature of the practice, the belief that racial profiling is unethical, and the perception that racial profiling is effective influence views on the topic. We find that each of these measures significantly influences public opinion regarding the view that public opinion occurs or that it is an acceptable practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-85
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Criminal Justice
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Anthropology
  • Law

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