Explosive, oppositional, and aggressive behavior in children with autism compared to other clinical disorders and typical children

Susan Mayes, Susan Calhoun, Richa Aggarwal, Courtney Baker, Santoshkumar Mathapati, Robert Anderson, Christopher Petersen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal ratings of explosiveness, opposition, and aggression were analyzed in 1609 children 6-16 years of age. Behavior problems were common in autism, ADHD-Combined type, and depression, whereas children with ADHD-Inattentive type, anxiety disorder, and acquired brain injury did not differ from typical controls. More than 40% of children with autism, ADHD-Combined type, and depression met criteria for oppositional-defiant disorder (ODD), and less than 15% did in the other groups. Male gender and low SES increased the risk of behavior problems, but correlations were small between behavior problems and age and IQ. Our findings have implications for new DSM-V diagnostic categories and criteria. The DSM-V needs to clarify whether or not an additional diagnosis of ODD should be made in children with autism who meet ODD criteria. The proposed DSM-V states that ADHD and temper dysregulation disorder with dysphoria not be diagnosed in autism, but does not mention ODD. Our study also suggests that diagnoses of temper dysregulation disorder with dysphoria and prepubertal bipolar disorder may be redundant to a diagnosis of ODD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalResearch in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Child Behavior
Autistic Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Depression
Risk-Taking
Anxiety Disorders
Aggression
Bipolar Disorder
Brain Injuries
Mothers

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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Explosive, oppositional, and aggressive behavior in children with autism compared to other clinical disorders and typical children. / Mayes, Susan; Calhoun, Susan; Aggarwal, Richa; Baker, Courtney; Mathapati, Santoshkumar; Anderson, Robert; Petersen, Christopher.

In: Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, Vol. 6, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 1-10.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Anderson, Robert

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