Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome

D. E. DeMello, David Phelps, G. Patel, Joanna Floros, D. Lagunoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn given rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1285-1293
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Pathology
Volume134
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989

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Surface-Active Agents
Molecular Weight
Lung
Newborn Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Proteins
Protein Deficiency
Staining and Labeling
Immune Sera
Phospholipids
Pulmonary Surfactant-Associated Proteins
Alveolar Epithelial Cells
Pulmonary Surfactants
tubular myelin
Air

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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title = "Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome",
abstract = "Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn given rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis.",
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Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome. / DeMello, D. E.; Phelps, David; Patel, G.; Floros, Joanna; Lagunoff, D.

In: American Journal of Pathology, Vol. 134, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 1285-1293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Expression of the 35kDa and low molecular weight surfactant-associated proteins in the lungs of infants dying with respiratory distress syndrome

AU - DeMello, D. E.

AU - Phelps, David

AU - Patel, G.

AU - Floros, Joanna

AU - Lagunoff, D.

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N2 - Newborn respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) results from a deficiency of pulmonary surfactant. Surfactant has three ultrastructural forms: lamellar bodies, which, when secreted from Type II pneumocytes, transform into tubular myelin; tubular myelin in turn given rise to the phospholipid monolayer at the air-fluid interface in the alveolus that constitutes functional surfactant. It has been shown previously that the lungs of infants dying from RDS lacked tubular myelin despite the presence of abundant lamellar bodies whereas the lungs of control infants dying from other causes had both tubular myelin and lamellar bodies. An abnormality in the conversion of lamellar bodies to tubular myelin in RDS was proposed as a possible explanation for this finding. To evaluate the role of surfactant proteins (SPs) in this conversion, the authors re-examined the lungs of 11 RDS infants and 10 control infants for reactivity with antisera to high and low molecular weight SPs. In control infants, abundant intense staining with antisera to both types of SPs was found, but in the RDS lungs, staining was weaker than that in controls and less intense for high molecular weight compared to low molecular weight SPs. In lungs from patients with RDS, although staining increased with increasing gestational and post-natal ages, the intensity was less than control levels at all ages. The correlation of deficiency of SPs in RDS with lack of tubular myelin suggests that SPs may be involved in the conversion of normal lamellar bodies to tubular myelin and that the deficiency of SPs could explain the persistent respiratory distress in the presence of surfactant phospholipid synthesis.

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