Extinction risk at high latitudes

Eric S Post, Jedediah Brodie

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Of the abiotic changes associated with the current phase of warming occurring on Earth, the loss of sea ice, snow cover, and glaciers are among the most apparent, rapid, and potentially ecologically devastating. These physical effects make polar regions the most likely places to experience first extinctions due to climate change. Have extinctions already been recorded in high latitude species, or do population trends suggest that extinctions are imminent? This chapter answers these questions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSaving a Million Species
Subtitle of host publicationExtinction Risk from Climate Change
PublisherIsland Press-Center for Resource Economics
Pages121-137
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781610911825
ISBN (Print)1597265691, 9781597265690
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2013

Fingerprint

extinction risk
extinction
polar region
snow cover
sea ice
glacier
warming
climate change

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Post, E. S., & Brodie, J. (2013). Extinction risk at high latitudes. In Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change (pp. 121-137). Island Press-Center for Resource Economics . https://doi.org/10.5822/978-1-61091-182-5_8
Post, Eric S ; Brodie, Jedediah. / Extinction risk at high latitudes. Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change. Island Press-Center for Resource Economics , 2013. pp. 121-137
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Post, ES & Brodie, J 2013, Extinction risk at high latitudes. in Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change. Island Press-Center for Resource Economics , pp. 121-137. https://doi.org/10.5822/978-1-61091-182-5_8

Extinction risk at high latitudes. / Post, Eric S; Brodie, Jedediah.

Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change. Island Press-Center for Resource Economics , 2013. p. 121-137.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Post ES, Brodie J. Extinction risk at high latitudes. In Saving a Million Species: Extinction Risk from Climate Change. Island Press-Center for Resource Economics . 2013. p. 121-137 https://doi.org/10.5822/978-1-61091-182-5_8