Extreme Hatred: Revisiting the Hate Crime and Terrorism Relationship to Determine Whether They Are “Close Cousins” or “Distant Relatives”

Colleen E. Mills, Joshua D. Freilich, Steven M. Chermak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

Existing literature demonstrates disagreement over the relationship between hate crime and terrorism with some calling them “close cousins,” whereas others declare them “distant relatives.” We extend previous research by capturing a middle ground between hate crime and terrorism: extremist hate crime. We conduct negative binomial regressions to examine hate crime by non-extremists, fatal hate crime by far-rightists, and terrorism in U.S. counties (1992-2012). Results show that counties experiencing increases in general hate crime, far-right hate crime, and non-right-wing terrorism see associated increases in far-right hate crime, far-right terrorism, and far-right hate crime, respectively. We conclude that hate crime and terrorism may be more akin to close cousins than distant relatives.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1191-1223
Number of pages33
JournalCrime and Delinquency
Volume63
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Law

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