Eye movements and reliance on external memory aids predict team success in a military planning task

Heather C. Lum, Valerie K. Sims, Nicholas C. Lagattuta, Michael A. Rosen, Eduardo Salas

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Participants completed a complex team exercise designed to mimic military planning operations. Each member of the three-person team was eye-tracked as they completed the group task. Members of successful teams had more fixations, were less reliant on external memory aids (push-pins), and created plans that were longer. Additionally, team members in key roles were more likely to experience decisional conflict and to have less confidence in their performance. Further examination of this finding showed that those who experienced greater decisional conflict also had fewer fixations. Low level eye movements may indicate high level team cognition.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
PublisherHuman Factors an Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages274-278
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781615676231
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009
Event53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009 - San Antonio, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 19 2009Oct 23 2009

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume1
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other53rd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting 2009, HFES 2009
CountryUnited States
CitySan Antonio, TX
Period10/19/0910/23/09

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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