Family contexts and schooling disruption among orphans in post-genocide Rwanda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between orphan status and schooling disruption in post-genocide Rwanda. The results indicate that while nonorphans have more favorable schooling outcomes in two-parent than in singleparent families, the reverse is true among Rwandan orphans. In single-mother households, paternal orphans, i.e. orphans with only a living mother, have better outcomes than their orphan and non-orphan counterparts. In contrast, paternal orphans have worse outcomes than other children in two-parent households, especially in households headed by males. Maternal orphans are more likely to experience schooling disruptions than non-orphans regardless of family structure. The maternal-orphan disadvantage is nevertheless greater in female-headed than in male-headed households. As expected, non-related orphans are more disadvantaged than orphans related to their household heads. However, non-related orphans have a greater disadvantage in two-parent than in single-parent households. The results also suggest that within households, the provision of childcare to children below schooling age is an impediment to orphan's schooling. These impediments are, however, greater for double-orphans than paternal or maternal orphans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-842
Number of pages24
JournalPopulation Research and Policy Review
Volume29
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

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genocide
orphan
Rwanda
education
parents
family
single parent
family structure
child care
household

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

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Family contexts and schooling disruption among orphans in post-genocide Rwanda. / Thomas, Kevin J.

In: Population Research and Policy Review, Vol. 29, No. 6, 01.01.2010, p. 819-842.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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