Fat supplements affect fractional rates of ruminal fatty acid biohydrogenation and passage in dairy cows

Kevin John Harvatine, Michael S. Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rates of fatty acid biohydrogenation and passage were determined for fat supplements varying in saturation using lactating dairy cows. First-order fractional passage rates were determined by dividing the duodenal flux of fatty acids by their respective ruminal pool sizes. The determination of rates of biohydrogenation required the development of a model to account for the transfer of fatty acids among pools. Ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows (n = 8) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatments were control and a linear substitution of 25 g/kg supplemented fatty acids varying in saturation as follows: saturated (prilled hydrogenated free fatty acids), intermediate mix of saturated and unsaturated (calcium soaps of long-chain fatty acids), and partially unsaturated fatty acids. Passage rates of 16:0, 18:0, and total 18-carbon fatty acids were linearly decreased with increasing unsaturated fatty acids and the trans-18:1 fractional passage rate was quadratically affected with a maximum for the intermediate treatment. Increasing unsaturated fatty acids increased the extent of 18:2 and 18:3 biohydrogenation and decreased the extent of 18:1 and trans-18:1 biohydrogenation. Calcium salts did not protect PUFA from ruminal biohydrogenation despite a mean ruminal pH of 6.0, and unsaturated fatty acids decreased ruminal biohydrogenation of trans-18:1, resulting in increased duodenal flow of these fatty acids. The model allows a mechanistic description of ruminal biohydrogenation and determination of the extent of 18:1 biohydrogenation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)677-685
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume136
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2006

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biohydrogenation
Fatty Acids
dairy cows
Fats
fatty acids
Unsaturated Fatty Acids
lipids
unsaturated fatty acids
Calcium
Soaps
calcium
soaps
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
mechanistic models
long chain fatty acids
Carbon
Salts
free fatty acids
Holstein
salts

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Rates of fatty acid biohydrogenation and passage were determined for fat supplements varying in saturation using lactating dairy cows. First-order fractional passage rates were determined by dividing the duodenal flux of fatty acids by their respective ruminal pool sizes. The determination of rates of biohydrogenation required the development of a model to account for the transfer of fatty acids among pools. Ruminally and duodenally cannulated multiparous Holstein cows (n = 8) were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design with 21-d periods. Treatments were control and a linear substitution of 25 g/kg supplemented fatty acids varying in saturation as follows: saturated (prilled hydrogenated free fatty acids), intermediate mix of saturated and unsaturated (calcium soaps of long-chain fatty acids), and partially unsaturated fatty acids. Passage rates of 16:0, 18:0, and total 18-carbon fatty acids were linearly decreased with increasing unsaturated fatty acids and the trans-18:1 fractional passage rate was quadratically affected with a maximum for the intermediate treatment. Increasing unsaturated fatty acids increased the extent of 18:2 and 18:3 biohydrogenation and decreased the extent of 18:1 and trans-18:1 biohydrogenation. Calcium salts did not protect PUFA from ruminal biohydrogenation despite a mean ruminal pH of 6.0, and unsaturated fatty acids decreased ruminal biohydrogenation of trans-18:1, resulting in increased duodenal flow of these fatty acids. The model allows a mechanistic description of ruminal biohydrogenation and determination of the extent of 18:1 biohydrogenation.",
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Fat supplements affect fractional rates of ruminal fatty acid biohydrogenation and passage in dairy cows. / Harvatine, Kevin John; Allen, Michael S.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 136, No. 3, 03.2006, p. 677-685.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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