Feasibility and outcomes: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care for community-dwelling older women with urinary incontinence

Christine M. Chu, Kathryn Schmitz, Kavita Khanijow, Hanna Stambakio, Diane K. Newman, Lily A. Arya, Uduak U. Andy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims: To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care in community-dwelling women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: We conducted a parallel arm, nonblinded, pilot randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder training with urge suppression and fall prevention program (ExerciseUP) vs usual care in women aged 65 and older with UI. Outcomes included feasibility (process, resources, management, and acceptability), urinary symptoms, and falls risk using self-administered questionnaires. Objective physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Results: A total of 37 of 38 (97%) eligible women were willing to participate in the study. In the ExerciseUP intervention cohort, 17 of 19 (89%) women completed all 6 weeks of intervention and follow-up, and 16 of 18 (89%) women in the usual group completed follow-up. Ten (53%) women in the ExerciseUP group achieved at least 70% adherence to exercise prescription. The improvement in UI severity scores from baseline was greater in the ExerciseUP intervention group than the usual care group (− 6.2 ± 5.8 vs − 2.4 ± 4.2, P = 0.04). Fall-risk score decreased (improved) in both groups. There were no significant between-group differences in change in physical activity or sedentary behavior. Conclusions: We determined that it would be feasible to conduct a home-based exercise intervention in older women with UI. Our clinical outcomes were modestly favorable for the ExerciseUP intervention group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1399-1408
Number of pages10
JournalNeurourology and Urodynamics
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2019

Fingerprint

Independent Living
Urinary Incontinence
Urinary Bladder
Randomized Controlled Trials
Exercise
Education
Accelerometry
Prescriptions

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Urology

Cite this

@article{454079ec053c4980a0372625cb3828af,
title = "Feasibility and outcomes: Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care for community-dwelling older women with urinary incontinence",
abstract = "Aims: To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care in community-dwelling women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: We conducted a parallel arm, nonblinded, pilot randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder training with urge suppression and fall prevention program (ExerciseUP) vs usual care in women aged 65 and older with UI. Outcomes included feasibility (process, resources, management, and acceptability), urinary symptoms, and falls risk using self-administered questionnaires. Objective physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Results: A total of 37 of 38 (97{\%}) eligible women were willing to participate in the study. In the ExerciseUP intervention cohort, 17 of 19 (89{\%}) women completed all 6 weeks of intervention and follow-up, and 16 of 18 (89{\%}) women in the usual group completed follow-up. Ten (53{\%}) women in the ExerciseUP group achieved at least 70{\%} adherence to exercise prescription. The improvement in UI severity scores from baseline was greater in the ExerciseUP intervention group than the usual care group (− 6.2 ± 5.8 vs − 2.4 ± 4.2, P = 0.04). Fall-risk score decreased (improved) in both groups. There were no significant between-group differences in change in physical activity or sedentary behavior. Conclusions: We determined that it would be feasible to conduct a home-based exercise intervention in older women with UI. Our clinical outcomes were modestly favorable for the ExerciseUP intervention group.",
author = "Chu, {Christine M.} and Kathryn Schmitz and Kavita Khanijow and Hanna Stambakio and Newman, {Diane K.} and Arya, {Lily A.} and Andy, {Uduak U.}",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/nau.23999",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "1399--1408",
journal = "Neurourology and Urodynamics",
issn = "0733-2467",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "5",

}

Feasibility and outcomes : Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care for community-dwelling older women with urinary incontinence. / Chu, Christine M.; Schmitz, Kathryn; Khanijow, Kavita; Stambakio, Hanna; Newman, Diane K.; Arya, Lily A.; Andy, Uduak U.

In: Neurourology and Urodynamics, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.06.2019, p. 1399-1408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility and outcomes

T2 - Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care for community-dwelling older women with urinary incontinence

AU - Chu, Christine M.

AU - Schmitz, Kathryn

AU - Khanijow, Kavita

AU - Stambakio, Hanna

AU - Newman, Diane K.

AU - Arya, Lily A.

AU - Andy, Uduak U.

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Aims: To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care in community-dwelling women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: We conducted a parallel arm, nonblinded, pilot randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder training with urge suppression and fall prevention program (ExerciseUP) vs usual care in women aged 65 and older with UI. Outcomes included feasibility (process, resources, management, and acceptability), urinary symptoms, and falls risk using self-administered questionnaires. Objective physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Results: A total of 37 of 38 (97%) eligible women were willing to participate in the study. In the ExerciseUP intervention cohort, 17 of 19 (89%) women completed all 6 weeks of intervention and follow-up, and 16 of 18 (89%) women in the usual group completed follow-up. Ten (53%) women in the ExerciseUP group achieved at least 70% adherence to exercise prescription. The improvement in UI severity scores from baseline was greater in the ExerciseUP intervention group than the usual care group (− 6.2 ± 5.8 vs − 2.4 ± 4.2, P = 0.04). Fall-risk score decreased (improved) in both groups. There were no significant between-group differences in change in physical activity or sedentary behavior. Conclusions: We determined that it would be feasible to conduct a home-based exercise intervention in older women with UI. Our clinical outcomes were modestly favorable for the ExerciseUP intervention group.

AB - Aims: To assess the feasibility of a randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder-training program vs usual care in community-dwelling women with urinary incontinence (UI). Methods: We conducted a parallel arm, nonblinded, pilot randomized controlled trial of a home-based integrated physical exercise and bladder training with urge suppression and fall prevention program (ExerciseUP) vs usual care in women aged 65 and older with UI. Outcomes included feasibility (process, resources, management, and acceptability), urinary symptoms, and falls risk using self-administered questionnaires. Objective physical activity was measured using accelerometry. Results: A total of 37 of 38 (97%) eligible women were willing to participate in the study. In the ExerciseUP intervention cohort, 17 of 19 (89%) women completed all 6 weeks of intervention and follow-up, and 16 of 18 (89%) women in the usual group completed follow-up. Ten (53%) women in the ExerciseUP group achieved at least 70% adherence to exercise prescription. The improvement in UI severity scores from baseline was greater in the ExerciseUP intervention group than the usual care group (− 6.2 ± 5.8 vs − 2.4 ± 4.2, P = 0.04). Fall-risk score decreased (improved) in both groups. There were no significant between-group differences in change in physical activity or sedentary behavior. Conclusions: We determined that it would be feasible to conduct a home-based exercise intervention in older women with UI. Our clinical outcomes were modestly favorable for the ExerciseUP intervention group.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85067403368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85067403368&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/nau.23999

DO - 10.1002/nau.23999

M3 - Article

C2 - 30998290

AN - SCOPUS:85067403368

VL - 38

SP - 1399

EP - 1408

JO - Neurourology and Urodynamics

JF - Neurourology and Urodynamics

SN - 0733-2467

IS - 5

ER -