Feasibility of using maternal cancer screening visits to identify adolescent girls eligible for human papillomavirus vaccination

Ruth C. Carlos, Amanda F. Dempsey, Ken Resnicow, MacK T. Ruffin, Divya A. Patel, Christopher M. Straus, Andrew Kure, Vanessa K. Dalton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Breast or cervical cancer screening visits may present an opportunity to motivate mothers to have their daughters vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV). In preparation for a future intervention study, we sought to establish the feasibility of using these visits to identify women with at least one daughter in the appropriate age range for adolescent HPV vaccination. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional mailed survey of women who had received breast or cervical cancer screening within the 6-18 months before the survey. The study was conducted at two diverse institutions: one serving a mostly black (54.1%) urban inner-city population and another serving a mostly white (87.5%) suburban population. Results: Our overall response rate was 28% (n=556) in the urban site and 38% (n=381) in the suburban site. In the urban site, the proportions of mothers completing mammography or Pap smear visits with HPV vaccine-eligible daughters were 23% and 24%, respectively. In the suburban site, the proportions of mothers completing mammography or Pap smear with at least one vaccine-eligible daughter were 41% and 26%, respectively. Conclusions: Women who undergo breast or cervical cancer screening in the two different demographic groups evaluated have at least one adolescent daughter at the appropriate age for HPV vaccination. An important implication of this finding in adolescent daughters of urban mothers is the potential use of maternal breast or cervical cancer screening encounters to target a potentially undervaccinated group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2271-2275
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Women's Health
Volume19
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Feasibility of using maternal cancer screening visits to identify adolescent girls eligible for human papillomavirus vaccination'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this