Feasibility Study of Engaging Barbershops for Prostate Cancer Education in Rural African-American Communities

John S. Luque, Siddhartha Roy, Yelena N. Tarasenko, Levi Ross, Jarrett Johnson, Clement K. Gwede

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The barbershop is a promising setting where African-American men might receive information and education about prostate cancer. In this study, we assessed the feasibility of engaging rural barbershops as venues for barbers to deliver a prostate cancer education intervention to increase informed decision-making for prostate cancer screening among customers. Twelve barbershops were recruited from two separate micropolitan areas in Georgia as intervention and control sites. Structured interviews were conducted with 11 barbers in both sites about customer characteristics as well as their willingness to participate in the study. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed for analysis. In the intervention site, six barbers completed a survey and a pre-/posttest prostate cancer knowledge instrument following training classes. Barbers reported a wide average range of customers served per week (50 to 300). African-American men made up an average of 87 % of customers. Barbers thought prostate cancer was an important discussion topic, felt they would be comfortable discussing it, and supported the participation of their barbershop in the study. For intervention group barbers, there was a statistically significant difference between the average pretest knowledge score of 72 % (mean 12.2, SD = 3.2) and the posttest knowledge score of 89 % (mean 15.2, SD = 1.1) (P = 0.03) on the 17-item prostate cancer knowledge instrument. Based on the multiple interactions with the barbers, there was high receptivity to the topic and consensus about the importance of addressing prostate cancer with their customers. Rural barbershops represent feasible venues for delivering a prostate cancer education intervention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)623-628
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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Feasibility Studies
African Americans
Prostatic Neoplasms
Education
Interviews
Early Detection of Cancer
Consensus
Decision Making

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Luque, John S. ; Roy, Siddhartha ; Tarasenko, Yelena N. ; Ross, Levi ; Johnson, Jarrett ; Gwede, Clement K. / Feasibility Study of Engaging Barbershops for Prostate Cancer Education in Rural African-American Communities. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2015 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 623-628.
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Feasibility Study of Engaging Barbershops for Prostate Cancer Education in Rural African-American Communities. / Luque, John S.; Roy, Siddhartha; Tarasenko, Yelena N.; Ross, Levi; Johnson, Jarrett; Gwede, Clement K.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.12.2015, p. 623-628.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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