Feedback informed treatment: An empirically supported case study of psychodynamic treatment

Stephanie Winkeljohn Black, Jesse Owen, Norah Chapman, Kelly Lavin, Joanna M. Drinane, Patty Kuo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The use of client feedback, via self-report measures of psychological functioning and working alliance, is an effective way to improve therapy outcomes. Despite this progress, there are many questions about the mechanisms of change for these systems. The current study employed a case study approach to examine the effectiveness of feedback informed treatment within a psychodynamic therapy. We examined the case based on therapy outcomes, alliance processes, and verbatim dialogue of in-session exchanges. We also conducted a semistructured interview with the therapist to understand how she used and interpreted the feedback within her psychodynamic approach. The results demonstrated positive therapy outcomes and that feedback assisted with alliance formation, specifically decision making about therapeutic tasks and managing negative countertransference. The therapist reported that the feedback enhanced her ability to work in the here and now and to identify relational patterns. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1499-1509
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of clinical psychology
Volume73
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Psychology

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