Feminizing robots: User responses to gender cues on robot body and screen

Eun Hwa Jung, T. Franklin Waddell, S. Shyam Sundar

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Robots are increasingly being deployed in a number of domains typically associated with female workers, e.g., caregiving. Although past robot morphology has favored a machine-like appearance that is often perceived as masculine, monitor-based robots provide designers with enhanced opportunities to include interface cues that convey femininity. However, it is unclear whether screen-based interface cues can elicit perceptions of femininity and what effects, if any, they would have on user evaluations of a robot. To address this, we conducted an experiment examining the effect of gender cue (male vs. female) and cue location (robot body vs. robot screen) upon user evaluations. Female interface cues, especially when conveyed via the screen, elicited greater perceptions of robot femininity than male interface cues. Implications for the design of social robotics are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCHI EA 2016
Subtitle of host publication#chi4good - Extended Abstracts, 34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery
Pages3107-3113
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781450340823
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2016
Event34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2016 - San Jose, United States
Duration: May 7 2016May 12 2016

Publication series

NameConference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Proceedings
Volume07-12-May-2016

Other

Other34th Annual CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, CHI EA 2016
CountryUnited States
CitySan Jose
Period5/7/165/12/16

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Software
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Computer Graphics and Computer-Aided Design

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