Field evaluation of temperature and velocity uniformity in tunnel and conventional ventilation broiler houses

Eileen Fabian, J. L. Zajaczkowski, N. C. Sabeh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This field evaluation compared the temperature and velocity uniformity within two commercial broiler houses. One house used conventional sidewall ventilation and the other used tunnel ventilation strategies. One goal of hot-weather ventilation is to exchange enough air to remove bird body heat. Introducing a significant convective (wind chill) over the birds is the primary objective of tunnel ventilation. The tunnel-ventilated house had average air velocities of 1.7 m/s [335 feet per minute (fpm)] and 2.6 m/s (509 fpm) during the first and second study period, respectively. Wind played an important role in determining air speed and direction within the curtain inlet end of the tunnel-ventilated house. Tunnel air speed at bird level was about two-thirds the air speed at human level. As anticipated, little wind chill was present in the conventionally ventilated house. The average air speed was 0.4 and 0.5 m/s (83 and 100 fpm) during the two 1-h, study periods. About one-half the cross-sectional area exhibited still air [<0.25 m/s (50 fpm)] conditions. Within the tunnel-ventilated house, bird level was the warmest zone in the exhaust fan end of the house despite the high air speeds and substantial air exchange rates. On average, the conventional house temperature was approximately 3.8°C (6.9°F) warmer than the outdoor temperature as compared to 2.6°C (4.7°F) for the tunnel house. Within both houses, the maximum difference between the maximum and minimum monitored temperatures was 2.8°C (5.0°F), which indicated acceptable temperature uniformity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-377
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Engineering in Agriculture
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - May 2003

Fingerprint

Ventilation
Tunnels
broiler chickens
Air
air
Temperature
Birds
temperature
Chills
birds
Ventilation exhausts
Weather
Fans
weather
Hot Temperature
heat

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "This field evaluation compared the temperature and velocity uniformity within two commercial broiler houses. One house used conventional sidewall ventilation and the other used tunnel ventilation strategies. One goal of hot-weather ventilation is to exchange enough air to remove bird body heat. Introducing a significant convective (wind chill) over the birds is the primary objective of tunnel ventilation. The tunnel-ventilated house had average air velocities of 1.7 m/s [335 feet per minute (fpm)] and 2.6 m/s (509 fpm) during the first and second study period, respectively. Wind played an important role in determining air speed and direction within the curtain inlet end of the tunnel-ventilated house. Tunnel air speed at bird level was about two-thirds the air speed at human level. As anticipated, little wind chill was present in the conventionally ventilated house. The average air speed was 0.4 and 0.5 m/s (83 and 100 fpm) during the two 1-h, study periods. About one-half the cross-sectional area exhibited still air [<0.25 m/s (50 fpm)] conditions. Within the tunnel-ventilated house, bird level was the warmest zone in the exhaust fan end of the house despite the high air speeds and substantial air exchange rates. On average, the conventional house temperature was approximately 3.8°C (6.9°F) warmer than the outdoor temperature as compared to 2.6°C (4.7°F) for the tunnel house. Within both houses, the maximum difference between the maximum and minimum monitored temperatures was 2.8°C (5.0°F), which indicated acceptable temperature uniformity.",
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Field evaluation of temperature and velocity uniformity in tunnel and conventional ventilation broiler houses. / Fabian, Eileen; Zajaczkowski, J. L.; Sabeh, N. C.

In: Applied Engineering in Agriculture, Vol. 19, No. 3, 05.2003, p. 367-377.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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