Field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring carbon dioxide and water vapor

Scott J. Richardson, Natasha L. Miles, Kenneth J. Davis, Eric R. Crosson, Chris W. Rella, Arlyn E. Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO 2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) is an emerging laser-based technique with the advantages of improved stability and concurrent water vapor measurements. Results are presented from 30 months of field measurements from WS-CRDS systems at five sites in the upper Midwest of the United States. These systems were deployed in support of the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) from May 2007 to November 2009. Excluding one site, 2σ of quasi-daily magnitudes of the drifts, before applying field calibrations, are less than 0.38 ppm over the entire 30-month field deployment. After applying field calibrations using known tanks sampled every 20 h, residuals from known values are, depending on site, from 0.02 ± 0.14 to 0.17 ± 0.07 ppm. Eight months of WS-CRDS measurements collocated with a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA)/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) NDIR system at West Branch, Iowa, show median daytime-only differences of -0.13 ± 0.63 ppm on a daily time scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)397-406
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

Fingerprint

Water vapor
Carbon dioxide
water vapor
cavity
carbon dioxide
spectroscopy
Spectroscopy
calibration
wavelength
infrared spectroscopy
Testing
Calibration
Wavelength
Infrared spectroscopy
mixing ratio
Research laboratories
laser
Towers
timescale
Drying

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ocean Engineering
  • Atmospheric Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO 2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (WS-CRDS) is an emerging laser-based technique with the advantages of improved stability and concurrent water vapor measurements. Results are presented from 30 months of field measurements from WS-CRDS systems at five sites in the upper Midwest of the United States. These systems were deployed in support of the North American Carbon Program's Mid-Continent Intensive (MCI) from May 2007 to November 2009. Excluding one site, 2σ of quasi-daily magnitudes of the drifts, before applying field calibrations, are less than 0.38 ppm over the entire 30-month field deployment. After applying field calibrations using known tanks sampled every 20 h, residuals from known values are, depending on site, from 0.02 ± 0.14 to 0.17 ± 0.07 ppm. Eight months of WS-CRDS measurements collocated with a National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administrations (NOAA)/Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) NDIR system at West Branch, Iowa, show median daytime-only differences of -0.13 ± 0.63 ppm on a daily time scale.",
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Field testing of cavity ring-down spectroscopy analyzers measuring carbon dioxide and water vapor. / Richardson, Scott J.; Miles, Natasha L.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Crosson, Eric R.; Rella, Chris W.; Andrews, Arlyn E.

In: Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 01.03.2012, p. 397-406.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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