Filter selection for a harmonic radar

Kyle A. Gallagher, Gregory J. Mazzaro, Anthony F. Martone, Kelly D. Sherbondy, Ram Mohan Narayanan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a harmonic radar system design, one of the most important components is the filter used to remove the self-generated harmonics by the high-power transmitter power amplifier, which is usually driven close to its 1-dB compression point. The obvious choice for this filter is a low-pass filter. The low-pass filter will be required to attenuate stop band frequencies with 100 dB attenuation or more. Due to the high degree of attenuation required, multiple low-pass filter will likely be required. Most commercially available low-pass filters are reflective devices, which operate by reflecting the unwanted high frequencies. Cascading these reflective filter causes issues in attenuating stop band frequencies. We show that frequency diplexers are more attractive in place of reflective low-pass filters as they are able to terminate the stop band frequencies as opposed to reflecting them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRadar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI
EditorsArmin Doerry, Chadwick Todd Hawley, G. Charmaine Gilbreath, Kenneth I. Ranney
PublisherSPIE
Volume9461
ISBN (Electronic)9781628415773
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventRadar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI - Baltimore, United States
Duration: Apr 20 2015Apr 23 2015

Other

OtherRadar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period4/20/154/23/15

Fingerprint

low pass filters
Low-pass Filter
Low pass filters
Radar
radar
Harmonic
Filter
harmonics
filters
Frequency bands
Attenuation
diplexers
attenuation
Wave filters
Power Amplifier
Terminate
Radar systems
power amplifiers
Power amplifiers
systems engineering

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Gallagher, K. A., Mazzaro, G. J., Martone, A. F., Sherbondy, K. D., & Narayanan, R. M. (2015). Filter selection for a harmonic radar. In A. Doerry, C. T. Hawley, G. C. Gilbreath, & K. I. Ranney (Eds.), Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI (Vol. 9461). [94610A] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2176858
Gallagher, Kyle A. ; Mazzaro, Gregory J. ; Martone, Anthony F. ; Sherbondy, Kelly D. ; Narayanan, Ram Mohan. / Filter selection for a harmonic radar. Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI. editor / Armin Doerry ; Chadwick Todd Hawley ; G. Charmaine Gilbreath ; Kenneth I. Ranney. Vol. 9461 SPIE, 2015.
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Gallagher, KA, Mazzaro, GJ, Martone, AF, Sherbondy, KD & Narayanan, RM 2015, Filter selection for a harmonic radar. in A Doerry, CT Hawley, GC Gilbreath & KI Ranney (eds), Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI. vol. 9461, 94610A, SPIE, Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI, Baltimore, United States, 4/20/15. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2176858

Filter selection for a harmonic radar. / Gallagher, Kyle A.; Mazzaro, Gregory J.; Martone, Anthony F.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Narayanan, Ram Mohan.

Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI. ed. / Armin Doerry; Chadwick Todd Hawley; G. Charmaine Gilbreath; Kenneth I. Ranney. Vol. 9461 SPIE, 2015. 94610A.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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AB - In a harmonic radar system design, one of the most important components is the filter used to remove the self-generated harmonics by the high-power transmitter power amplifier, which is usually driven close to its 1-dB compression point. The obvious choice for this filter is a low-pass filter. The low-pass filter will be required to attenuate stop band frequencies with 100 dB attenuation or more. Due to the high degree of attenuation required, multiple low-pass filter will likely be required. Most commercially available low-pass filters are reflective devices, which operate by reflecting the unwanted high frequencies. Cascading these reflective filter causes issues in attenuating stop band frequencies. We show that frequency diplexers are more attractive in place of reflective low-pass filters as they are able to terminate the stop band frequencies as opposed to reflecting them.

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Gallagher KA, Mazzaro GJ, Martone AF, Sherbondy KD, Narayanan RM. Filter selection for a harmonic radar. In Doerry A, Hawley CT, Gilbreath GC, Ranney KI, editors, Radar Sensor Technology XIX; and Active and Passive Signatures VI. Vol. 9461. SPIE. 2015. 94610A https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2176858