Filtrate flux and sieving characteristics of virus filtration membranes

Andrew Zydney, David M. Bohonak

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Virus filtration is increasingly used in the biopharmaceutical industry, but capacity and fouling remain problematic. Experimental studies were conducted in dead-end, stirred filtration cells with Viresolve 180 polyvinylidene fluoride membranes using the protein bovine serum albumin. Data were obtained for membranes in two different flow orientations, with the selective "skin" layer oriented on either the upstream surface or downstream relative to the fluid flow. Compaction of the substructure occurs when the skin layer is downstream, leading to a significant increase in membrane resistance. Concentration polarization in the bulk solution or membrane substructure caused a substantial increase in the protein sieving coefficient, with this effect being greatest when the flow entered through the substructure. Fouling is primarily due to the deposition of large protein aggregates. The effect of this fouling on the flux was reduced when the skin layer was oriented downstream since the substructure acted as a prefilter. These results demonstrate that the membrane morphology and orientation play a critical role in determining the overall performance of virus filtration membranes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)303-308
Number of pages6
JournalMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
Volume752
StatePublished - Jul 25 2003
EventMembranes Preparation Properties and Applications - Boston MA, United States
Duration: Dec 2 2002Dec 5 2002

Fingerprint

viruses
Viruses
Fluxes
membranes
substructures
Membranes
Fouling
fouling
Skin
proteins
Proteins
Bovine Serum Albumin
vinylidene
Flow of fluids
albumins
Membrane Proteins
Compaction
serums
upstream
fluid flow

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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Filtrate flux and sieving characteristics of virus filtration membranes. / Zydney, Andrew; Bohonak, David M.

In: Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings, Vol. 752, 25.07.2003, p. 303-308.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

TY - JOUR

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AU - Bohonak, David M.

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N2 - Virus filtration is increasingly used in the biopharmaceutical industry, but capacity and fouling remain problematic. Experimental studies were conducted in dead-end, stirred filtration cells with Viresolve 180 polyvinylidene fluoride membranes using the protein bovine serum albumin. Data were obtained for membranes in two different flow orientations, with the selective "skin" layer oriented on either the upstream surface or downstream relative to the fluid flow. Compaction of the substructure occurs when the skin layer is downstream, leading to a significant increase in membrane resistance. Concentration polarization in the bulk solution or membrane substructure caused a substantial increase in the protein sieving coefficient, with this effect being greatest when the flow entered through the substructure. Fouling is primarily due to the deposition of large protein aggregates. The effect of this fouling on the flux was reduced when the skin layer was oriented downstream since the substructure acted as a prefilter. These results demonstrate that the membrane morphology and orientation play a critical role in determining the overall performance of virus filtration membranes.

AB - Virus filtration is increasingly used in the biopharmaceutical industry, but capacity and fouling remain problematic. Experimental studies were conducted in dead-end, stirred filtration cells with Viresolve 180 polyvinylidene fluoride membranes using the protein bovine serum albumin. Data were obtained for membranes in two different flow orientations, with the selective "skin" layer oriented on either the upstream surface or downstream relative to the fluid flow. Compaction of the substructure occurs when the skin layer is downstream, leading to a significant increase in membrane resistance. Concentration polarization in the bulk solution or membrane substructure caused a substantial increase in the protein sieving coefficient, with this effect being greatest when the flow entered through the substructure. Fouling is primarily due to the deposition of large protein aggregates. The effect of this fouling on the flux was reduced when the skin layer was oriented downstream since the substructure acted as a prefilter. These results demonstrate that the membrane morphology and orientation play a critical role in determining the overall performance of virus filtration membranes.

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