Fine-needle aspiration biopsy for cytopathologic analysis

Utility of syringe handles, automated guns, and the nonsuction method

K. D. Hopper, Catherine Abendroth, K. W. Sturtz, Y. L. Matthews, S. J. Shirk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The performances of seven techniques and devices used with 22-gauge needles to obtain biopsy specimens for cytologic analysis were compared by means of single-blinded evaluation with an objective, previously published grading scheme. A total of 420 specimens were obtained from 10 fresh human cadavers (42 specimens per cadaver), including 30 hepatic, 20 renal, and 10 pancreatic specimens per technique or device. No statistical differences existed in the liver, kidney, or pancreas or in the combined data in the performance of the aspirator gun, syringe holders, vacuum needle, and end-cut gun versus the manual aspiration biopsy technique performed with a 22-gauge Chiba needle. However, nonaspiration, fine-needle capillary biopsy (FNCB) performed statistically significantly worse than any other technique or device in the kidney and pancreas and in comparison with the overall combined data. In the liver, no statistically significant difference existed in the overall performance of FNCB versus conventional aspiration biopsy, but the amount of cellular material obtained with FNCB was statistically significantly less.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-824
Number of pages6
JournalRadiology
Volume185
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Syringes
Firearms
Fine Needle Biopsy
Needles
Needle Biopsy
Kidney
Cadaver
Equipment and Supplies
Pancreas
Liver
Vacuum
Biopsy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Hopper, K. D. ; Abendroth, Catherine ; Sturtz, K. W. ; Matthews, Y. L. ; Shirk, S. J. / Fine-needle aspiration biopsy for cytopathologic analysis : Utility of syringe handles, automated guns, and the nonsuction method. In: Radiology. 1992 ; Vol. 185, No. 3. pp. 819-824.
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Fine-needle aspiration biopsy for cytopathologic analysis : Utility of syringe handles, automated guns, and the nonsuction method. / Hopper, K. D.; Abendroth, Catherine; Sturtz, K. W.; Matthews, Y. L.; Shirk, S. J.

In: Radiology, Vol. 185, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 819-824.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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