'Finish your soup': Counterproductive effects of pressuring children to eat on intake and affect

Amy T. Galloway, Laura M. Fiorito, Lori A. Francis, Leann L. Birch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

283 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The authors examined whether pressuring preschoolers to eat would affect food intake and preferences, using a repeated-measures experimental design. In the experimental condition, children were pressured to eat by a request to finish their food. We collected intake data, heights and weights, child-feeding practices data, and children's comments about the food. Children consumed significantly more food when they were not pressured to eat and they made overwhelmingly fewer negative comments. Children who were pressured to eat at home had lower body mass index percentile scores and were less affected by the pressure in the lab setting than children who were not pressured at home. These data provide experimental evidence supporting previous correlational research indicating that pressure can have negative effects on children's affective responses to and intake of healthy foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)318-323
Number of pages6
JournalAppetite
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

Food
Eating
Pressure
Food Preferences
Body Mass Index
Research Design
Weights and Measures
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Galloway, Amy T. ; Fiorito, Laura M. ; Francis, Lori A. ; Birch, Leann L. / 'Finish your soup' : Counterproductive effects of pressuring children to eat on intake and affect. In: Appetite. 2006 ; Vol. 46, No. 3. pp. 318-323.
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'Finish your soup' : Counterproductive effects of pressuring children to eat on intake and affect. / Galloway, Amy T.; Fiorito, Laura M.; Francis, Lori A.; Birch, Leann L.

In: Appetite, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.05.2006, p. 318-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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