Firm management of scientific information: An empirical update

Gregory McMillan, Robert D. Hamilton, David L. Deeds

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to extend and test a model proposed by McMillan and colleagues in 1995. That model posited that research-intensive firms that are more 'cooperative' or open in publishing their scientific findings will have higher research and development (R&D) productivity than more secretive firms. In addition, four possible predictors of this scientific information openness are proposed in lieu of two in the 1995 article. Our current effort includes an empirical examination of twenty pharmaceutical firms over thirteen years, and finds substantial support for many of the proposed relationships. In addition, interviews with field practitioners independently confirmed many of the findings. The managerial implications are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)177-182
Number of pages6
JournalR and D Management
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2000

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Drug products
Productivity
Openness
R&D productivity
Predictors
Pharmaceuticals

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business and International Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Strategy and Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

McMillan, Gregory ; Hamilton, Robert D. ; Deeds, David L. / Firm management of scientific information : An empirical update. In: R and D Management. 2000 ; Vol. 30, No. 2. pp. 177-182.
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Firm management of scientific information : An empirical update. / McMillan, Gregory; Hamilton, Robert D.; Deeds, David L.

In: R and D Management, Vol. 30, No. 2, 01.01.2000, p. 177-182.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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