Flavonoid intake is inversely associated with obesity and C-reactive protein, a marker for inflammation, in US adults

J. A. Vernarelli, J. D. Lambert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of flavonoid intake and disease risk, however the association between flavonoid intake and obesity has not been evaluated in a nationally representative sample of US adults. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between flavonoid consumption and established risk factors for obesity and obesity-related inflammation. Data from a nationally representative sample of 9551 adults who participated in the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Flavonoid consumption was inversely associated with obesity in both men and women in multivariate models. Adults in the highest quartile of flavonoid intake had significantly lower body mass index and waist circumference than those in the lowest quartile of flavonoid intake (P<0.03 and P<0.04, respectively), and flavonoid intake was inversely related to C-reactive protein levels in women (p-trend, 0.01). These findings support a growing body of laboratory evidence that flavonoid consumption may be beneficial for disease prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere276
JournalNutrition and Diabetes
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 15 2017

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Flavonoids
C-Reactive Protein
Obesity
Inflammation
Nutrition Surveys
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

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abstract = "Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of flavonoid intake and disease risk, however the association between flavonoid intake and obesity has not been evaluated in a nationally representative sample of US adults. The objective of the study was to evaluate the association between flavonoid consumption and established risk factors for obesity and obesity-related inflammation. Data from a nationally representative sample of 9551 adults who participated in the 2005-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) were analyzed. Flavonoid consumption was inversely associated with obesity in both men and women in multivariate models. Adults in the highest quartile of flavonoid intake had significantly lower body mass index and waist circumference than those in the lowest quartile of flavonoid intake (P<0.03 and P<0.04, respectively), and flavonoid intake was inversely related to C-reactive protein levels in women (p-trend, 0.01). These findings support a growing body of laboratory evidence that flavonoid consumption may be beneficial for disease prevention.",
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Flavonoid intake is inversely associated with obesity and C-reactive protein, a marker for inflammation, in US adults. / Vernarelli, J. A.; Lambert, J. D.

In: Nutrition and Diabetes, Vol. 7, No. 5, e276, 15.05.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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