Flexible robust binder-free carbon nanotube membranes for solid state and microcapacitor application

Kofi Adu, Danhao Ma, Yuxiang Wang, Michael Spencer, Ramakrishnan Rajagopalan, C. Yu Wang, Clive Randall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present a liquid phase post synthesis self-assemble protocol that transforms trillions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in powder form into densely packed flexible, robust and binder-free macroscopic membranes with a hierarchical pore structure. We employ charge transfer engineering to spontaneously disperse the CNTs in a liquid medium. The processing protocol has limited or no impact on the intrinsic properties of the CNTs. As the thickness of the CNT membrane is increased, we observed a gradual transition from high flexibility to buckling and brittleness in the flexural properties of the membranes. The binder-free CNT membranes have bulk mass density greater than that of water (1.0 g cm-3). We correlate the mass of the CNTs in the membrane to the thickness of the membrane and obtained a bulk mass density of ∼1.11 g cm-3 0.03 g cm-3. We demonstrate the use of the CNT membranes as electrode in a pristine and oxidized single/stacked solid-state capacitor as well as pristine interdigitated microcapacitor that show time constant of ∼32 ms with no degradation in performance even after 10 000 cycles. The capacitors show very good temperature dependence over a wide range of temperatures with good cycling performance up to 90 °C. The specific capacitance of the pseudocapacitive CNT electrode at room temperature was 72 F g-1 and increased to 100 F g-1 at 70 °C. The leakage current of bipolar stacked solid state capacitor was ∼100 nA cm-2 at 2.5 V when held for 72 h.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number035605
JournalNanotechnology
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 19 2018

Fingerprint

Carbon Nanotubes
Binders
Carbon nanotubes
Membranes
Capacitors
Electrodes
Liquids
Brittleness
Pore structure
Leakage currents
Powders
Temperature
Buckling
Charge transfer
Capacitance
Degradation
Water
Processing

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Bioengineering
  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

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abstract = "We present a liquid phase post synthesis self-assemble protocol that transforms trillions of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in powder form into densely packed flexible, robust and binder-free macroscopic membranes with a hierarchical pore structure. We employ charge transfer engineering to spontaneously disperse the CNTs in a liquid medium. The processing protocol has limited or no impact on the intrinsic properties of the CNTs. As the thickness of the CNT membrane is increased, we observed a gradual transition from high flexibility to buckling and brittleness in the flexural properties of the membranes. The binder-free CNT membranes have bulk mass density greater than that of water (1.0 g cm-3). We correlate the mass of the CNTs in the membrane to the thickness of the membrane and obtained a bulk mass density of ∼1.11 g cm-3 0.03 g cm-3. We demonstrate the use of the CNT membranes as electrode in a pristine and oxidized single/stacked solid-state capacitor as well as pristine interdigitated microcapacitor that show time constant of ∼32 ms with no degradation in performance even after 10 000 cycles. The capacitors show very good temperature dependence over a wide range of temperatures with good cycling performance up to 90 °C. The specific capacitance of the pseudocapacitive CNT electrode at room temperature was 72 F g-1 and increased to 100 F g-1 at 70 °C. The leakage current of bipolar stacked solid state capacitor was ∼100 nA cm-2 at 2.5 V when held for 72 h.",
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Flexible robust binder-free carbon nanotube membranes for solid state and microcapacitor application. / Adu, Kofi; Ma, Danhao; Wang, Yuxiang; Spencer, Michael; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Wang, C. Yu; Randall, Clive.

In: Nanotechnology, Vol. 29, No. 3, 035605, 19.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Adu, Kofi

AU - Ma, Danhao

AU - Wang, Yuxiang

AU - Spencer, Michael

AU - Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan

AU - Wang, C. Yu

AU - Randall, Clive

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